Large Format is the Wild West of Photography

My ambitious young photographer friend Mac Crosby came by the office earlier this week, at my invitation, so I could lend her a Minolta X-700 and a couple of lenses, as well as a couple of antique 620 cameras. Readers might recall that Mac wrote a neat piece about my wife Abby and me for class last March (link).

Photographer Mac Crosby looks at some of the thousands of 4x5 negatives on file at my newspaper.
Photographer Mac Crosby looks at some of the thousands of 4×5 negatives on file at my newspaper.

In recent months, Mac has been curating film photography into her body of work as an aspiring photojournalist, and that has included disposable cameras, 35mm film cameras, medium format cameras, and even toy cameras. Photography with toy cameras is sometimes called lomography.

One thing I showed her while she was here at the office is some of the thousands of 4×5-inch black-and-white negatives we have in our files at The Ada News.

4×5 negatives are about 15 times larger than 35mm film frames, so they potentially contain a tremendous amount of detail. In fact, 4×5 negatives are large enough that they can be printed as contact prints, in which the film is laid directly on the printing paper and exposed to light, skipping the step of putting the film in an enlarger.

I lent my friend and fellow photographer Mac Crosby this Minolta X-700, a 35mm film camera from the late 1980s. I hope she dazzles me with the results she gets with it.
I lent my friend and fellow photographer Mac Crosby this Minolta X-700, a 35mm film camera from the late 1980s. I hope she dazzles me with the results she gets with it.

If 35mm film is common and medium format film is exotic, 4×5 film is the Wild West of photography.

I’ve never owned a 4×5 camera. I do have a photographer friend, Robert in Tulsa, who has a Burke and James 4×5 field camera. A field camera differs from a view camera in that it uses a viewfinder instead of a focusing hood or cloth. If you have ever seen the movie Flags of Our Fathers, the character of Joe Rosenthal uses a 4×5 field camera to photograph the raising of the second U.S. flag on Iwo Jima.

As Mac and I talked about film photography, she said she’d like to see what I could do with film, and I pointed out that in the very office in which she sat were literally hundreds of thousands of film frames I made during my career, from when I started at The Ada News in October 1988 until about the middle of 2005, when I had enough digital cameras to get the job done, and when the film scanner of 1998 vintage finally died.

I also told Mac that if she gets a chance to use a darkroom in her travels or education, I’d be glad to tag along and throw in my expertise. I’d also extend that invitation to anyone who wants to learn about how a darkroom works. It’s pretty amazing that I can’t remember what I had for dinner last night, but I can tell you exactly how to process a roll of film.

Three children use a water pump in this image made on 4x5 inch sheet film. The film is from an envelope marked, “Oakman Homecoming, Published Oct. 21, 1954, in weekly.” That means that the children in this image are in their 70s now.
Three children use a water pump in this image made on 4×5 inch sheet film. The film is from an envelope marked, “Oakman Homecoming, Published Oct. 21, 1954, in weekly.” That means that the children in this image are in their 70s now.

Most Popular Camera Ever?

The beautifully-made Canon AE-1 Program camera sits in my home studio recently.
The beautifully-made Canon AE-1 Program camera sits in my home studio recently.

A friend of mine recently asked me to look over an older film camera of his. He told me he had grown up making pictures with it. I I told him I would be happy to look it over, and to drop it by my office. I wasn’t surprised when the that camera showed up the next day was a Canon AE-1 Program, one of the most popular cameras ever made.

The battery for the Canon AE-1 Program sits inside a door on the front of the camera.
The battery for the Canon AE-1 Program sits inside a door on the front of the camera.

Before I go on, let me say that I’m not usually a “they don’t build them like they used to” guy, since technology has swept us away with all kinds of advancement, from the smartphone to the self-diagnosing car engine, but on this occasion, well… they just don’t build them like they used to.

The Canon AE-1 Program came from an era of rapid advancement in camera design, and includes some very advanced technology in it, but it also inherited the build quality, fit, and finish of the handmade and hand-assembled era of camera development.

The shutter speed dial can be set to program which, in combination with setting the aperture ring on the lens to "A" will allow the camera to set both shutter speed and aperture.
The shutter speed dial can be set to program which, in combination with setting the aperture ring on the lens to “A” will allow the camera to set both shutter speed and aperture.

The AE-1 Program followed the AE-1, which was probably the most popular camera ever sold in the film era. The “Program” was a piece of tech that allowed the camera to pick both the shutter speed and the aperture, and was the first of that feature to be introduced.

In-hand, this camera has a big-camera feel. In contrast to almost any digital camera today, it is heavy. The corners and grips of the camera are fairly conventional, and the controls are laid out nicely. I can pick up a camera like this and immediately start using it.

The Canon 50mm f/1.8 is a great lens, but most 50mm lenses are. They are easy and cheap to make, and are capable of making great images.
The Canon 50mm f/1.8 is a great lens, but most 50mm lenses are. They are easy and cheap to make, and are capable of making great images.

I cleaned it up with a soft toothbrush and some canned air. It had a fair amount of back-of-the-closet dust on it. This particular one seemed to run just fine. The shutter and aperture cycled like they should. Focus on the 50mm f/1.8 lens, a fine piece of glass that every Canon owner had during that era, was smooth and accurate. The only thing I could find wrong with it was the light seals – the foam rubber in the slots on the film door – was dry and cracked, which could cause light leaks, especially in bright sunlight.

If my friend is willing to buy film then have it processed and scanned or printed, his Canon AE-1 Program is ready for the job.

The Canon AE-1 Program is shown with its lens removed.
The Canon AE-1 Program is shown with its lens removed.

Reflecting on Mirrorless

My new/used Fujifilm X-T10 sits in my home studio this week.
My new/used Fujifilm X-T10 sits in my home studio this week.
The Fujifilm has an articulating screen on the back for low and high angle shooting. Most of my shooting will be using the electronic viewfinder, which was a must-have when I was shopping for mirrorless.
The Fujifilm has an articulating screen on the back for low and high angle shooting. Most of my shooting will be using the electronic viewfinder, which was a must-have when I was shopping for mirrorless.

Mirrorless digital cameras have matured nicely alongside the rest of digital imaging, and are, today, at the top of the game. There are plenty of great mirrorless camera systems in the photography world today. Sony was one of the first leaders in the field, but the industry has caught up in recent years, and Fujifilm, Canon, Nikon, Panasonic, and others all have competitive models.

So what exactly is “mirrorless?” For decades the most popular cameras in the industry, both film and digital, were single lens reflex cameras, or SLRs. These cameras use a mirror to reflect light entering the lens into a viewfinder on top of the camera. Mirrorless cameras do away with the mechanically complex system of mirrors and pentaprisms by shining light from the lens directly on the imaging sensor, then showing it to the photographer using a display on the back of the camera or in an electronic viewfinder.

A digital single lens reflex camera and a single lens reflex film camera with their lenses removed how the mirror used to reflect light into the viewfinder.
A digital single lens reflex camera and a single lens reflex film camera with their lenses removed how the mirror used to reflect light into the viewfinder.

Mirrorless matured hand-in-hand with smartphone technology. The same way a phone gives you a live view on-screen, the mirrorless camera does as well. 10 or 15 years ago, this process was too slow for action photography, as the camera took time to process and display the image, causing a lag between the action on front of the camera and what the photographer saw.

The biggest advantage of mirrorless is size and weight. Mirrorless cameras are small and light.

I hesitated to buy mirrorless because I already have a lot of really great cameras, but for my birthday recently, my wife encouraged me to find something I would like in the field. I hunted for a bargain, since I love bargains, and I mostly looked at finding a kindly-used Fuji. One of my first cameras was a Fuji, and my wife and I have matching Fuji travel/all-in-one cameras, and I love their style.

The 2015 Fujifilm X-T10 sits next to the 1978 Fujica ST-605n.
The 2015 Fujifilm X-T10 sits next to the 1978 Fujica ST-605n.
The X-T10 has a pop-up flash, but with the exception of fill flash in broad daylight, this feature produces very poor light.
The X-T10 has a pop-up flash, but with the exception of fill flash in broad daylight, this feature produces very poor light.

I’ve said this many times, but it bears repeating: buying cameras used is the way to go, at least for me. You get powerful, expensive technology for a fraction of the original price because someone decided to “upgrade,” which is industry code language for trying to buy better photography by spending money on hardware.

The camera I found and bought is the Fujifilm X-T10 of 2015 vintage. In 2015, it was at the top of photographic technology, and the introduction of newer cameras since then has no effect on what this camera can do.

The controls on many Fuji mirrorless cameras are throwbacks to the manual-everything days, and are immaculately made and fitted.
The controls on many Fuji mirrorless cameras are throwbacks to the manual-everything days, and are immaculately made and fitted.
Simple converters with no mechanical or electronic connections in them are very cheap, and let me use all manner of lenses on this Fuji mirrorless.
Simple converters with no mechanical or electronic connections in them are very cheap, and let me use all manner of lenses on this Fuji mirrorless.

I didn’t buy any lenses with this camera, because part of the allure of mirrorless is, for me anyway, the fact that with an adaptor, you can put just about any lens on your mirrorless camera. This is possible because the imaging sensor in mirrorless cameras is right behind the lens, not buried behind the mirror box and mechanical shutter of older cameras.

This is my very first image with the Fujifilm X-T10, of a pillbox shaped like a camera my wife gave me years ago. I shot it with the Fujinon 55mm f/2.2 lens wide open, and it is surprisingly sharp.
This is my very first image with the Fujifilm X-T10, of a pillbox shaped like a camera my wife gave me years ago. I shot it with the Fujinon 55mm f/2.2 lens wide open, and it is surprisingly sharp.

The only thing I actively dislike about mirrorless cameras are the name. “Mirrorless” is a lazy, techno-pop-culture fallback name. Saying that a class of cameras is “mirrorless” is like saying most cars are “diesel-less,” which is true, but a lame way of naming them.

I have already made some impressive images with this amazing machine, and hope to keep making more as I explore its potential.

Putting my very first SLR lens, a Fujinon 55mm screw-mount, on my new/used X-T10 is a very satisfying tribute to my photographic history.
Putting my very first SLR lens, a Fujinon 55mm screw-mount, on my new/used X-T10 is a very satisfying tribute to my photographic history.

Olympus Has Fallen

This is also my “Picture This” column for June 27, 2020

A thunderstorm looms over our Nissan Frontier at a turnout on Interstate 40 in New Mexico in 2016. I shot this with my Olympus FE-5020 because it was in my shirt pocket.
A thunderstorm looms over our Nissan Frontier at a turnout on Interstate 40 in New Mexico in 2016. I shot this with my Olympus FE-5020 because it was in my shirt pocket.

Nobody likes cameras better than I do. I like old ones and new ones. I like film cameras and digital cameras. I like cameras of all sorts and brand names.

I wanted a picture of myself in Zebra Slot Canyon at Grand Staircase/Escalante National Monument in April 2015, so I handed my Olympus FE-5020 to a fellow hiker.
I wanted a picture of myself in Zebra Slot Canyon at Grand Staircase/Escalante National Monument in April 2015, so I handed my Olympus FE-5020 to a fellow hiker.

So no one was sorrier than I was when I learned this week that Olympus is getting out of the camera business.

Olympus, a Japanese camera maker founded in 1939, made a huge name for themselves by making cameras that were very compact. For years, because of this, my wife Abby and I owned and used several Olympus point-and-shoot cameras, and made some great images with them.

Sadly, for the last three years Olympus hasn’t been able to make their camera division profitable. This is despite their impressive Micro Four Thirds mirrorless cameras and excellent Zuiko lenses. One Olympus camera I have coveted since the day it was introduced is the TG-Tracker, a super-compact point-of-view/action cam that was not only tiny, it was incredibly great-looking. I never needed one, but I recommended it to several people who hoped to buy an action cam.

Photographer Jim Beckel and I photographed a sunrise at Canyonland National Park, Utah, in the spring of 2013. This image was made with my tiny Olympus FE-5020.
Photographer Jim Beckel and I photographed a sunrise at Canyonland National Park, Utah, in the spring of 2013. This image was made with my tiny Olympus FE-5020.
I still have this point-and-shoot camera, the excellent Olympus FE-5020.
I still have this point-and-shoot camera, the excellent Olympus FE-5020.

It is becoming increasingly difficult to sell cameras in a camera-in-smartphone world. My wife and I are examples of why: our current smartphones rival the images we got from our Olympus point-and-shoot cameras from years ago, so we are seldom motivated to bring a point-and-shoot along.

The photography press says that Olympus is selling their camera division to Japan Industrial Partners, but time will tell if their firm will continue to make cameras, or simply liquidate all the assets. It may be true: Olympus has fallen.

Abby and I handed my Olympus FE-5020 to a fellow hiker to make this picture of us at Canyonlands National Park in October 2010.
Abby and I handed my Olympus FE-5020 to a fellow hiker to make this picture of us at Canyonlands National Park in October 2010.

Always Be Ready to Make the Picture

The sun rises over the Canadian River north of Byng. This image was made with a wide angle lens.
The sun rises over the Canadian River north of Byng. This image was made with a wide angle lens.

Anticipating an early voter turnout Tuesday, I drove directly from our home in Byng to Konawa to cover the school bond issue election. It was just after seven in the morning, and the sun was still below the horizon. I immediately noticed that farm ponds had fog above them and anticipated that the Canadian River, which I would shortly cross, would as well.

I drove across the U.S. 377 bridge, parked in a safe spot, put on my highway safety vest, grabbed three cameras and walked to the center of the bridge over the river. For the record, I don’t recommend this, and I did it as a journalist. I know, I know — do as I say, not as I do, but drivers can get distracted in a moment, and it’s not always easy to see in early morning light.

The sun rises over the Canadian River north of Byng. This image was made with a 70mm lens.
The sun rises over the Canadian River north of Byng. This image was made with a 70mm lens.

Sunlight caught the rising fog exactly as I had anticipated, and the scene did not disappoint. I shot it with all three cameras — one with a 300mm lens, one with an 80-200mm lens,and one with a wide angle. All three scenes expressed something slightly different about the scene, and I was glad I lugged all the hardware with me.

How many times has someone come up to me with their phone in hand and started telling me, “I didn’t have my camera with me, but…” They then show me an image they made with their phone that tells only part of the story. Despite constantly improving technology in smartphones, they lack something. Maybe they lack the attitude of a camera.

The lesson is: Always have your camera with you. I know this is easy to say if you’re like me and have had cameras within arm’s reach since I was in high school, but it can really pay off.

The sun rises over the Canadian River north of Byng. This image was made with a 300mm lens.
The sun rises over the Canadian River north of Byng. This image was made with a 300mm lens.

A Nod to My Old School

I spotted our friend, aspiring journalist Ashlynd, at the scrimmage and made this image. Kodak digital cameras had a unique, and appealing, color pallet.
I spotted our friend, aspiring journalist Ashlynd, at the scrimmage and made this image. Kodak digital cameras had a unique, and appealing, color pallet.

Sometimes I like to get out old gear and shoot with it, with the goal of making certain I don’t rely too heavily on technology to get my job done well. Yesterday I was inspired to dig my Kodak DCS 720x out of its box at the bottom of the gear cabinet to shoot a football scrimmage at the local college, and although that technology is from 2001, I made some great images with it. Look for them in my newspaper next week!

I read recently that Kodak only made about 1600 720x cameras. I’m not surprised, as the company was already deep into its inexorable slide toward bankruptcy.

The Kodak DCS 720x sits next to one of my Nikon D2Hs, making it look tiny by comparison. Despite its age, the Kodak can still make great images in the right hands.
The Kodak DCS 720x sits next to one of my Nikon D2Hs, making it look tiny by comparison. Despite its age, the Kodak can still make great images in the right hands.

The Lens That Never Fails

My AF-S 85mm F/1.8 Nikkor sits in my studio. It's a nice image of a great lens, but it feels weird not having a filter and a hood on it.
My AF-S 85mm F/1.8 Nikkor sits in my studio. It’s a nice image of a great lens, but it feels weird not having a filter and a hood on it.

It’s no secret that I am a lens guy. Old and new, cheap and expensive, I think photographic lenses are fascinating. I have quite a few lenses, from the tiny, dusty, fixed-focus, brassed-up lenses on my Kodak Retina, to the heavy, complex f/2.8 sports and news zooms I use every day. But if you ask me to name an all-time favorite… wow. All those lenses. But, my all-time favorite lens has to be the 85mm.

Abby and I pose for a portrait in beautiful autumn sunshine recently. I handed our photographer friend Robert my Nikon D7100 with the AF-S 85mm f/1.8 on it, knowing that his expertise and that lens would give us a great result.
Abby and I pose for a portrait in beautiful autumn sunshine recently. I handed our photographer friend Robert my Nikon D7100 with the AF-S 85mm f/1.8 on it, knowing that his expertise and that lens would give us a great result.

I have owned three, the AF Nikkor 85mm f/1.8 of 1990s vintage, the Nikkor 85mm f/2.0 of early-80s heritage, and my current 85mm, the AF-S Nikkor 85mm f/1.8G.

Over the years I read that the oldest of the three, the f/2.0, wasn’t great, but my experience differed. It was an amazing lens. The least of the three was the AF from the 90s, optically similar to the others, but built with a lot of plastic, including a plastic bushing in the focus chain that wore out and made the lens stiff. Eventually Nikon stopped supporting it so I could no longer get it repaired, and I stopped using it. I eventually gave it away.

My current 85mm is a real gem. I wrote about it a couple of times right after I got it, but I thought it would be helpful to mention that after three years with this lens in my bag, I use it as often as I can, from weddings to portraits to commercial work, with lots of occasions when I grab it to photograph my wife Abby or our dogs.

Our photographer friend Robert used it to photograph Abby and me in November, and those images are among my favorite all-time images of us.

In class in October, I handed this 85mm to a photography student, Daniel O’Danielle, who used it for about 30 minutes. The next week, she had a new one on her camera. I also recently talked about this lens with another photographer who has one, Dan Marsh, who also sang praises about it.

I thought of all this last night at sunset. I grabbed the 85mm once again and walked out to photograph the peach blossoms in my orchard. It didn’t disappoint me.

My peach blossoms take on a subtle beauty as the sun sets last night. This image took the AF-S 85mm f/1.8 to its limits: shot at f/2, this image was made right at the len's closest focus point. It is sharp, the colors are dazzling, and the background moves away as gracefully as Audrey Hepburn.
My peach blossoms take on a subtle beauty as the sun sets last night. This image took the AF-S 85mm f/1.8 to its limits: shot at f/2, this image was made right at the len’s closest focus point. It is sharp, the colors are dazzling, and the background moves away as gracefully as Audrey Hepburn.

The Sweet Morning Fog

I shot this on my way to work this morning, fortuitous that my first assignment required a different route to work than I usually take. I jumped out of my car and half-ran across a mostly-empty four-lane highway to get into position.

Steam billows over a farm pond between Byng and Ada, Oklahoma Saturday morning, March 16; shot with the Nikon D300S and the AF-S Nikkor 80-200mm f/2.8.
Steam billows over a farm pond between Byng and Ada, Oklahoma Saturday morning, March 16; shot with the Nikon D300S and the AF-S Nikkor 80-200mm f/2.8.

A Look Back: the FujiFilm FinePix S4500

The Fujifilm FinePix S4500 Digital Camera
The Fujifilm FinePix S4500 Digital Camera
Our son-in-law Tom Reeves uses his FinePix S4500 to photograph the World War II National Memorial in Washington DC in 2013.
Our son-in-law Tom Reeves uses his FinePix S4500 to photograph the World War II National Memorial in Washington DC in 2013.

My wife Abby and I gave this camera, the Fujifilm FinePix S4500, to Abby’s daughter Chele and her husband Tom in 2013. Tom used it extensively on a trip we made to visit him that year in Baltimore, to photograph a D.C. walking tour.

Abby and I have several FinePix cameras (like the HS30EXR,) which have become our favorites when we place having fun at the top of the list, like when we are hiking, on the road, or at an event like family reunions. Smaller cameras like the these, in a class referred to as bridge, walkaround or crossover, allow the handling of a DSLR while offering the convenience of a point-and-shoot or even a smartphone.

I made this wide angle view of an exterior while working in December using the S4500. As you can see, it is sharp, and color is good.
I made this wide angle view of an exterior while working in December using the S4500. As you can see, it is sharp, and color is good.
Later that evening made this image of the House on Goose Hill at the telephoto end of the S4500's zoom. I is not as sharp as the wide angle end, but usable.
Later that evening made this image of the House on Goose Hill at the telephoto end of the S4500’s zoom. I is not as sharp as the wide angle end, but usable.
  • The S4500 features a versatile wide-to-telephoto zoom lens, but doesn’t not have a zoom ring or a manual focus ring, relying instead on a W and T rocker switch around the shutter release for zooming. There is no option for manual focusing, though I seldom use manual focus on my other bridge cameras.
  • In hand, this camera handles like a camera, not like a toy or a computer, which is why Abby and I were attracted to it.
A big plus to cameras in this class is the huge zoom range they offer, making it a one-camera solution for all kinds of photography.
A big plus to cameras in this class is the huge zoom range they offer, making it a one-camera solution for all kinds of photography.
  • The sensor in this camera is quite small at 6.17mm x 4.55 mm, both to keep the camera compact, and to make it cheaper to manufacture.

    14 Megapixels is enough, particularly when each pixel is so small crammed into a sensor the size of a raisin.
    14 Megapixels is enough, particularly when each pixel is so small crammed into a sensor the size of a raisin.
  • There is an electronic viewfinder and a display on the back of the camera. For my work, an electronic or optical viewfinder is a must, though I know most people get along fine with the arm’s-length view that smartphones provide.
  • Color is good; this is a Fuji strength for me, though not everyone agrees.
  • High ISO noise makes the camera unusable in low light. I tried to make a feature photo of the score table at a basketball tournament, and it was a mess.
  • The S4500 has a real PASM exposure dial, a must for me. Of course, it can fall back on green box (red in Fuji’s case) mode and scene modes, which I never use.
  • Like a lot of lenses on this class of cameras, this 24-500mm “equivalent” zoom is a jack of all trades but master of none. It is an especially mediocre telephoto.
The FinePix S4500 has a pretty standard control setup. Zooming is via a ring around the shutter release.
The FinePix S4500 has a pretty standard control setup. Zooming is via a ring around the shutter release.
  • Other controls are where I like them, though over the years I’ve worked with so many cameras (due to teaching photography), I almost always have to search for where electronics engineers put them. Making the same functions a little different in every camera generation and every brand doesn’t really serve photography, but is all about marketing and creating entertainment in camera sales.
Tom, Robert and I make pictures in a mirrored display near the Capitol in Washington D.C.
Tom, Robert and I make pictures in a mirrored display near the Capitol in Washington D.C.

Like all tools in our photographic tool box, the FinePix S4500 has a place. It is fun and easy to use, lightweight and quiet, and does a lot more than a smartphone. I am very glad we got this one for Tom and Chele.

Tom and Chele share a moment as they make pictures with their FinePix S4500.
Tom and Chele share a moment as they make pictures with their FinePix S4500.

A Look Back: the Nikon D700

My well-used Nikon D700 sits in my studio recently. I have no problem buying used cameras with a lot of cosmetic wear, since I'm going to start using them, not admiring them, immediately, and in the process will create lots of of cosmetic wear of my own.
My well-used Nikon D700 sits in my studio recently. I have no problem buying used cameras with a lot of cosmetic wear, since I’m going to start using them, not admiring them, immediately, and in the process will create lots of of cosmetic wear of my own.

In the 2000s, camera makers like Nikon and Canon introduced digital single lens reflex cameras (DSLRs) equipped with so-called full-frame sensors, imaging sensing devices that were the same size as an antiquated piece of 35mm film.

My Nikon D700 poses in my studio recently.
My Nikon D700 poses in my studio recently.

I have one such digital SLR, the Nikon D700. It is a professional machine on every level, from build quality to image quality. It is big, heavy, and built like a tank. It is so heavy, in fact, that I am a little glad I don’t use it every day at work. My D300Ss are heavy enough, but don’t begin to challenge the D700.

Much of the weight of cameras like this is one reason mirrorless cameras are overtaking DSLR sales. Combined with better electronics systems that can be made lighter and faster-operating, mirrorless does away with all the mechanics of the mirrors and pentaprisms.

One of the best ways to tell if a photographer works hard and shoots a lot is to look at his or her gear: working photographers wear out their equipment.
One of the best ways to tell if a photographer works hard and shoots a lot is to look at his or her gear: working photographers wear out their equipment.
I saw this D700 in use on The Plaza in Santa Fe when Abby and I were there recently.
I saw this D700 in use on The Plaza in Santa Fe when Abby and I were there recently.

A deceptive concept about formats is that larger formats exhibit “better” selective focus in the form of shallower depth of field. But the truth of this is buried in marketing and the internet. Depth of field isn’t controlled by format size, but by aperture and magnification. Larger-format afficianatoes don’t seem to understand that when shooting with a camera like the D700 with the same lens they might have on a smaller-format camera, they have to move closer to fill the frame with the same subject. That’s what makes depth of field shallower, not the size of the sensor.

I shot this walnut leaf with the Nikon D700 and my 50mm f/1.4 at f/1.6. Compare it to...
I shot this walnut leaf with the Nikon D700 and my 50mm f/1.4 at f/1.6. Compare it to…
...this image of an oak leaf made with my Nikon D7100 and the 35mm f/1.8 at f/2.0.
…this image of an oak leaf made with my Nikon D7100 and the 35mm f/1.8 at f/2.0.

I had this discussion not long after I bought my D700. You can read it here (link).

The D700 was one of Nikon’s earliest moves into the 36x24mm sensor market, and despite having been replaced by numerous newer models, the D700’s build and reputation create a higher than average cost on the used market.

The Nikon D700 is able to take advantage of wide angle lenses designed for 35mm film photography, like this, the excellent AF Nikkor 20mm f/2.8.
The Nikon D700 is able to take advantage of wide angle lenses designed for 35mm film photography, like this, the excellent AF Nikkor 20mm f/2.8.

Taking the idea of “full-frame” another step, we ask, “Is full-frame digital better than a full frame of 35mm film.” The answer overwhelmingly yes. Properly implemented, digital photography in general is far better than film photography: less noise, less risk, less waste, less time, more sharpness, better color, and on and on. (Coming soon: why the resurgence of film is folly.)

When I grab my D700, which usually has a larger lens on it, I feel it immediately. All that brass and glass tugs at my elbow and shoulder and reminds me why I try to lighten my load when I am able.

While I was writing this, I handed the D700 with the 28-70mm f/2.8 on it to my wife Abby, and she exclaimed, “Oh, my gosh, it must weigh 50 pounds!”

One thing that is true among the information and misinformation on the web about "full-frame" is that sensors of the 36mm x 24mm will restore your 35mm film lenses to their former glory, as in this image made last fall with the 15-30mm Sigma lens at 15mm.
One thing that is true among the information and misinformation on the web about “full-frame” is that sensors of the 36mm x 24mm will restore your 35mm film lenses to their former glory, as in this image made last fall with the 15-30mm Sigma lens at 15mm.

Files from the D700 are smooth, sharp and low-noise, and even with RAW file compression turned on, have a remarkable amount of color data. Despite the size and weight, the D700 has never let me down, and I hope to continue to make great images with it for the foreseeable future.

The hefty Nikon D700 wears the even heftier AF-S Nikkor 28-70mm f/2.8. The combination creates dazzling images, and is a great choice for events like weddings.
The hefty Nikon D700 wears the even heftier AF-S Nikkor 28-70mm f/2.8. The combination creates dazzling images, and is a great choice for events like weddings.

Skyward

The eclipsed moon and the constellation Orion are visible in this view of the night sky Sunday, Jan. 20, 2019. This image was made with the Nikon D700 and a 20mm f/2.8 AF Nikkor lens.
The eclipsed moon and the constellation Orion are visible in this view of the night sky Sunday, Jan. 20, 2019. This image was made with the Nikon D700 and a 20mm f/2.8 AF Nikkor lens.
The author's 400mm f/3.5 Nikkor points skyward toward the lunar eclipse of Jan. 20, 2019.
The author’s 400mm f/3.5 Nikkor points skyward toward the lunar eclipse of Jan. 20, 2019.

A Look Back: The Nikon D200

The Nikon D200 stands tall on its MB-D200 vertical grip. The D200 is a good-looking, great-handling camera from the mid-2000s.
The Nikon D200 stands tall on its MB-D200 vertical grip. The D200 is a good-looking, great-handling camera from the mid-2000s.

The Nikon D200 digital single lens reflex (DSLR) camera is a sturdy, capable, good-looking camera from the mid-2000s. It has a 10.2 megapixel sensor that will shoot from ISO 100 to 3200, a decent autofocus system, and it fits just right in my longish hands.

I’ve made tens of thousands of images with my D200s. I own three, all gotten cheap on Ebay, though one of them died earlier this year. In 2018, I don’t consider the D200 a front-line camera, but I still grab them from time to time, and they still deliver.

Luminaries glow at Relay for Life 2014 at Ada High School Friday, May 30, 2014. Made with one of my D200 cameras, color, contrast, and sharpness are all excellent.
Luminaries glow at Relay for Life 2014 at Ada High School Friday, May 30, 2014. Made with one of my D200 cameras, color, contrast, and sharpness are all excellent.

At the end of the film era, many of us used the excellent Nikon F100 SLR, often with the MB-15 vertical grip. I had two of them at my newspaper from 1997 until I retired the last one in 2005, when I only shot a handful of film negatives.

We waited eagerly for its digital equivalent.

The F100, sometimes nicknamed the “Baby F5,” was everything we could want in a film SLR, viceless, well-built, and a pleasure to use. When the D100 appeared, it didn’t deliver on the promise to be the digital F100. The D100 was slow to shoot, slow to think, and sported some very awkward controls, most notably the badly-implemented exposure mode dial. See my D100 review here (link.)

It wasn’t until November of 2005 that we got a look at what would be the “digital F100,” the Nikon D200.

The Nikon D200 digital SLR stands tall on its MB-D200 vertical grip with an older AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 lens mounted.
The Nikon D200 digital SLR stands tall on its MB-D200 vertical grip with an older AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 lens mounted.
  • I was amazed when I saw the noise in this image made with a D200 by a photographer at another newspaper, until I realized it was originally a JPEG, not a raw file. I shoot raw files exclusively with the D200.
    I was amazed when I saw the noise in this image made with a D200 by a photographer at another newspaper, until I realized it was originally a JPEG, not a raw file. I shoot raw files exclusively with the D200.

    Build quality is head and shoulders above its predecessors, the D70 and the D100, and its contemporary, the D80. The D200 feels solid in hand, and its operations feel smooth and powerful.

  • Though the rubber coating on Nikon D70s is disintegrating into a sticky mess, the same-era D200’s rubber grip panels are fine.
  • Image quality at modest ISO settings (below about 1600) is excellent, with sharp details, accurate color, and low noise. ISO 3200, which is “Hi-1” on the display, is pretty noisy, and it’s not good-looking noise, tending toward blotchiness.
Ty Hoppe nervously chews on his tassel prior to Latta High School's first ever commencement ceremonies in their new multi-million dollar gym Tuesday evening, May 20, 2014. Though somewhat noisy at the D200's maximum ISO of 3200, the image still worked well.
Ty Hoppe nervously chews on his tassel prior to Latta High School’s first ever commencement ceremonies in their new multi-million dollar gym Tuesday evening, May 20, 2014. Though somewhat noisy at the D200’s maximum ISO of 3200, the image still worked well.
  • With the MB-D200 multi power battery grip, it holds two batteries, and adds a vertical shutter release. This combination feels and looks very professional.
  • Media storage is the Compact Flash (CF) card, which I have always liked because it is about the right size for my workflow and in my hands. SD cards seem a little small and easy to lose, although I now use them all the time and have never lost one.
The back of the Nikon D200, which is the side we use, after all, has the usual controls in the usual places. An odd choice was to made some of the lettering pale yellow.
The back of the Nikon D200, which is the side we use, after all, has the usual controls in the usual places. An odd choice was to made some of the lettering pale yellow.
  • The D80, introduced a few months after the D200, uses the same sensor, but is constructed of plastic.
  • The D200 viewfinder is large and bright, and the monitor is big for its time at 2.5 inches diagonal.
  • The D200 has a pop-up flash on the pentaprism, a feature I occasionally wish was on pro models for use as fill light in sunny situations.
  • The exposure mode button on the top of the D200 is a professional standard. It made scrolling through the P, A, S, and M exposure modes quick and easy.
    The exposure mode button on the top of the D200 is a professional standard. It made scrolling through the P, A, S, and M exposure modes quick and easy.

    Unlike all models aimed at amateur photographers, the D200 does not have an exposure mode dial, but an exposure mode button, which I very much prefer. It doesn’t need the mode dial because it doesn’t offer “green box” mode or scene modes, which are used almost exclusively by amateur photographers.

  • Also unlike current amateur Nikon cameras, the D200 has a focus motor in the lens mount, so it will focus older AF Nikkor lenses.
  • The D200 has an aperture indexing ring around the lens mount, allowing it to use automatic exposure with non-autofocus lenses.
  • Color out of the D200 is adequate, but even using the “vivid” setting, it can be a little on the muted side. Both noise and color rendering are vastly improved by shooting raw files.
  • The D200 can be converted to shoot infrared.
This is the Vietnam Veterans travelling wall, which visited Ada a few years ago. The D200s 10.2 megapixel sensor has enough resolution to give an image like this excellent sharpness and clarity.
This is the Vietnam Veterans travelling wall, which visited Ada a few years ago. The D200s 10.2 megapixel sensor has enough resolution to give an image like this excellent sharpness and clarity.

Overall, I would say that the Nikon D200 was an excellent camera for news, sports and magazine photography, and though it is older technology, I have no intention of retiring or selling mine; for one thing, they cost nearly nothing, and I couldn’t get anything for them if I wanted to sell them. Ebay shows D200s in good condition for less than $200, sometimes less than $100. It’s also worth noting that if someone gave me one, or I saw one at a garage sale for $25, I wouldn’t hesitate for a minute to snatch it up.

One of my photography students smiles in late summer sunshine in this image made with the Nikon D200 and my AF Nikkor 180mm f/2.8.
One of my photography students smiles in late summer sunshine in this image made with the Nikon D200 and my AF Nikkor 180mm f/2.8.