Photographs and Memories

We all cherish memories. Many of us have fairly accurate memories, while others struggle to keep dates and people and places organized in their heads.

Abby and I pose on the giant jackrabbit in Joseph City, Arizona in July 2003.
Abby and I pose on the giant jackrabbit in Joseph City, Arizona in July 2003.

I believe the very best way to preserve memories is to write down the events of your life. It can be in a journal or scrapbook, as text files on your computer (preferably then printed onto paper), or in some kind of personal web presence, like an online journal or blog, some of which, hopefully, can be marked “private.”

I also happen to think that if you let social media curate your memories, you are either dead inside, or are being played by global corporations. Think about it: social media has no idea what stirs you to tears, but it does know what you buy.

Abby holds her Nikon Coolpix 885 as she and I have a photo session in the late winter of 2004.
Abby holds her Nikon Coolpix 885 as she and I have a photo session in the late winter of 2004.

I thought about this as I was enjoying a different kind of memory visit: looking through computer folders of image files from some of those great times my friends and family had over the years.

I photograph and write about all our travels, both in my journal, and here on my web site. One I visited recently was a folder of only-lightly-edited images from the first vacation Abby and I took together in 2003, The High Road. (Click it.)

It was a great time for both of us, both as a couple and photographically.

As I searched these images, I found two instances of images I had passed over at the time, two of hers and two of mine,  that both looked like they would be interesting to stitch into panographs.

When Abby made pictures of Vermilion Cliffs in northern Arizona on U.S. 89a, she didn't realize that two images she made could be stitched into this beautiful panograph.
When Abby made pictures of Vermilion Cliffs in northern Arizona on U.S. 89a, she didn’t realize that two images she made could be stitched into this beautiful panograph.
Abby and I were driving from Natural Bridges National Monument in Utah to Page, Arizona. Dark had fallen on us as we made our wave through the winding U.S. 160 when we drove into a shaft of red light from the sun setting in Tsegi Canyon. We immediately drove through it into the dark again, but made a u-turn to make this image, a stitch of two frames from my Minolta Dimage 7i.
Abby and I were driving from Natural Bridges National Monument in Utah to Page, Arizona. Dark had fallen on us as we made our wave through the winding U.S. 160 when we drove into a shaft of red light from the sun setting in Tsegi Canyon. We immediately drove through it into the dark again, but made a u-turn to make this image, a stitch of two frames from my Minolta Dimage 7i.

Abby shot with the Nikon Coolpix 885, a tiny camera I bought two years earlier as a throw-in-a-travel bag camera. When we started dating, she adopted it, and it became hers. I shot with the Minolta Dimage 7i, which I still have to this day.

The Nikon Coolpix 885 was just the right size for Abby's slender hands. She made images with it for years until it finally died.
The Nikon Coolpix 885 was just the right size for Abby’s slender hands. She made images with it for years until it finally died.

Both cameras came from the start of the digital photography era, and though they have some significant technological limitations, we made some amazing images, and, most importantly, we made memories.

I love this humble camera, the Minolta DiMage 7i from 2002. I especially like its color rendition, and its gorgeous 14-point sunstars when shooting into the sun.
I love this humble camera, the Minolta DiMage 7i from 2002. I especially like its color rendition, and its gorgeous 14-point sunstars when shooting into the sun.

 

Autumn Walk for Inspiration

Virginia creeper vines turn red in the fall, and have tiny green berries on them.
Virginia creeper vines turn red in the fall, and have tiny green berries on them.

A hard cold front roared through Oklahoma last night, leaving today the kind of day that inspired me to write awkward poetry in my youth. It was grey all day, and it eventually lured me outside several times to walk the dogs and, of course, make pictures.

I grabbed my Fuji mirrorless and my $50 Mamiya Sekor SX 200mm f/3.5. Unlike the cameras and lenses I use professionally, this combination is challenging: the camera is smaller, and the lens is manual focus, super slow to focus, focuses in the opposite direction of my Nikkors, and will only run at one aperture, in this case wide open at f/3.5.

After the session, I walked our Irish wolfhound Hawken again, and he found a discarded work glove in the pasture and made it his new toy. He loves this weather.

Hawken keeps an eye on me as I walk around photographing autumn.
Hawken keeps an eye on me as I walk around photographing autumn.
Tiny blue berries cling to the fence near my garden.
Tiny blue berries cling to the fence near my garden.
Thistle sways in the cold wing.
Thistle sways in the cold wing.
A roll of fence catches a leaf or two in the breeze.
A roll of fence catches a leaf or two in the breeze.
Guinea fowl keep watch in the neighbor's chicken pen.
Guinea fowl keep watch in the neighbor’s chicken pen.
A rooster struts his stuff.
A rooster struts his stuff.
I am gradually learning the strengths and weaknesses of this pearl of a lens from the 1970s.
I am gradually learning the strengths and weaknesses of this pearl of a lens from the 1970s.

The Yard Session

Years after the Nikon D100 digital camera has been retired from my workflow, it's easy to talk about its shortcomings. Despite those, the D100 actually was able to create beautiful images.
Years after the Nikon D100 digital camera has been retired from my workflow, it’s easy to talk about its shortcomings. Despite those, the D100 actually was able to create beautiful images.

My wife Abby and I have made many great photographs of each other over the years, both at our home in the bucolic splendor of Southern Oklahoma, and on our dozens of road trips over the years.

I bought the Nikon Coolpix 885 in the summer of 2002 as a small alternative to the Nikons I was using professionally at the time. By the time Abby and I had been dating a few months, she had made it her own.
I bought the Nikon Coolpix 885 in the summer of 2002 as a small alternative to the Nikons I was using professionally at the time. By the time Abby and I had been dating a few months, she had made it her own.

One session that stands out among them, and always makes me smile to view and remember, is “The Yard Session.” We shot these images on February 26, 2004 (thanks, EXIF data!) It was a warm late afternoon in our friend Michael‘s front yard in Norman, Oklahoma. The light was beautiful, and I’d asked Michael to photograph us with his Fujifilm Finepix S2 Pro. His images are great, but the ones that stand out and bring us the fondest reminiscences are the ones we made of each other.

Abby photographed me with our Nikon Coolpix 885, and I photographed her with my Nikon D100 with the manual-focus 85mm f/2.0 lens. Because the D100 lacked an aperture indexing ring, it couldn’t talk to manual-focus lenses, so exposure was based entirely using histogram on the monitor on the back of the camera.

Images like this happen organically, often without  planning or effort, and the result is a very natural, telling, intimate photography session.

Looking back on that moment more than 16 years ago, we were young and in love, engaged to be married, and so very happy. I hope these images show that.