Our Boneless Holiday

On the left is Abby's boneless turkey, and on the right is my Tofurky. Both were just right.
On the left is Abby’s boneless turkey, and on the right is my Tofurky. Both were just right.
Max the Chihuahua gives me one of his "who, me?" looks after I caught him stealing cracker wrappers from Abby's trash can yesterday.
Max the Chihuahua gives me one of his “who, me?” looks after I caught him stealing cracker wrappers from Abby’s trash can yesterday.

I took yesterday, the day before Thanksgiving, off so I could cook. Last week I found a nice light+dark boneless turkey for Abby, and bought two Tofurkys®, one for the office potluck and one for me for the actual holiday. I baked Abby an apple pie at her request. We also had asparagus, stuffing (the subject of an office debate Tuesday as being properly called “dressing”), and broccoli rice casserole. Except for her Abby’s gravy, I cooked it all.

We sat through a couple of movies and napped. I walked Hawken the Wolfhound. The Chihuahuas stayed in our laps.

Home for this holiday.

Sierra the Chihuahua sniffs me out from Abby's lap last night.
Sierra the Chihuahua sniffs me out from Abby’s lap last night.
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Beauty of the Fire

Sparks fly above the brush pile fire on the pond last night.
Sparks fly above the brush pile fire on the pond last night.

I have waxed romantic about burning my brush piles in the past (here, here, here, herehere, and here), and last night was just as romantic and meditative as ever. The weather was calm and cool.

I should probably mention that few things burn as fiercely and noisily, or make as much smoke, as refrigerator doors.
I should probably mention that few things burn as fiercely and noisily, or make as much smoke, as refrigerator doors.

The pile was a secondary one I made from branches around the pond, so the pile was on the dry center of the pond. You can make up any joke you want about my pond catching fire… I certainly did so last night.

One thing about listening to music last night: I was really chasing it. I had my finger on the “next” button of my  iPod Shuffle, and as a song came on, I would skip it in a second or two, trying to find the right song for my mood, which changed as soon as I let a song play.

I thought of everyone and everything. If you are reading this, I was thinking about you.

Branches from dead trees around my pond hang off my brush pile fire last night, with our house in the distance.
Branches from dead trees around my pond hang off my brush pile fire last night, with our house in the distance.
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To Hell with the Constitution, Not Me Too, and No, I’m Not Sorry

Presumption of innocence
“Ei incumbit probatio qui dicit, non qui negat.” (the burden of proof is on the one who declares, not on one who denies)

Criminal conviction by public opinion, usually through the media, and more recently through social media, is one of the most dangerous aspects of 21st century society. It feeds into a network of rage and powerlessness that makes people into a bloodthirsty mob.

If I look cynical, there is a reason.
If I look cynical, there is a reason.

Why? Because “police say XXX abused over 70 children.” Did you know (and I am guessing you did but don’t care) that no one is guilty of anything because “police said so.” It takes more than that, because police are fallible and can make mistakes, can be too eager to believe what they want to hear, and are as easily corrupted as any other human beings. Most importably, it is because the Constitution, the foundational document of our nation, says so.

Periodically, society goes through strange, self-induced, self-sustaining, and ultimately self-destructive waves of bullying disguised as justice. If you don’t believe and behave in favor of their conclusions, you are the enemy, and advocate the target of their outrage by proxy. It’s not enough to be silent. If you don’t condemn their enemies to hell, you, too, are the devil. Trends like #ICantBreathe, #blacklivesmatter, and in the last few weeks, #metoo invite you to comply or be cast out.

A Facebook thread on the ironically-named “Friendly Atheist” page recently called me as “asshole” for  suggesting that everyone, including an accused child molester, is entitled to due process. Their argument was that, “He’s charged with 160 counts, and that’s good enough for me. He’s guilty as far as I’m concerned.” Dangerous. Dangerous.

I don’t participate in any of these recent social media/social justice trends for several reasons…

  • I don’t let popularity or peer pressure make any decisions for me, good or bad.
  • I don’t let the internet or the people around me label me as anything, since they don’t know me. It’s one of the stupidest games groupthink can invent: “Hey, that’s guy’s not wearing a Holocaust ribbon. He must hate Jews!”
  • I have first-hand experience with a trend I was bullied into accepting, satanic cultism, that turned out to be demonstrably false and debunked. At the time, though, I felt a lot of pressure to accept it and the thousands of claims by women who said they’d been molested and raped in satanic rituals. In the end, that whole scene was an example of mass delusion and mass hysteria, and many lives were ruined by it (see link for an example), for absolutely no reason at all.

So I don’t wear Colin Kapernick shirts, I don’t use #ItWasMe, and I have no intention of apologizing for being myself, even if I made mistakes. Honestly, a bloodthirsty social justice cadré hates me for my race and gender, and already blame me for all that is wrong in the world.

Also, free speech: Aside from being guaranteed by the law of the land, it is actually fairly difficult to exercise free speech. If you say the wrong thing at the wrong time to the wrong people, even jokingly, even speculatively, you could face complete ruin. On the other hand, if you say things that are universally insensitive and yet are in certain situations with certain people, even genuinely terrible things, you can still prosper.

Think I’m wrong? Read the entire real, verified President Trump (ouch, that hurt to type) “Grab ’em by the pussy… You can do anything…” quote here (link). Yet somehow, a major fraction of the people in our nation don’t react to those comments as they, at least I think, should.

At this point, we are going through another period of mass hysteria, certainly about child molestation and sexual harassment, but also with the inclination to believe one thing with one ear and despise it with the other, not really knowing anything about any of it.

Photographing absurdities and believing atrocities
Photographing absurdities and believing atrocities
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Dude, Take a Breath

I have half a dozen angry rants halfway composed in my drafts folder. I am very sure all this anger is bad for me, especially for my teeth, which I grind when I feel outrage.

These are the Ada Cougar football moms at last week's outdoor pep rally. I know about 3/4 of them, and they all know me. It is an honor to be a part of their lives and help record their history.
These are the Ada Cougar football moms at last week’s outdoor pep rally. I know about 3/4 of them, and they all know me. It is an honor to be a part of their lives and help record their history.

So, what’s going well in this mortal coil?

One of my students shot this of me last night when I was talking about lenses. Do you think I look professorial?
One of my students shot this of me last night when I was talking about lenses. Do you think I look professorial?
  • I walk Hawken the Irish Wolfhound every day, and twice on days when I have time. The experience is good for both of us, and adds nearly a mile to my already active lifestyle.
  • My health is fine, and though my wife has underlying health problems, she’s doing okay too.
  • My newspaper is using my images like never before, thanks to a vacancy on our staff leaving us a little short on content, our decision to stop using irrelevant content from around the state (which our readers don’t like), and the fact that I shooting as well as I ever have.
  • Also at work, I am scanning and publishing old photos from the film era, which has been nothing but fun.
  • I am teaching well lately. I just last night I wrapped up another beginner session last night.
  • The days and nights of November are beautiful.

I don’t like to dwell on troubles, since it doesn’t help. Politics, crime, injustice. I can vote, and that’s about it. I need to remember to breath, and stop grinding my teeth.

Our Wolfhound's full name is Hawken Rifle Trail, and this is Hawken's trail.
Our Wolfhound’s full name is Hawken Rifle Trail, and this is Hawken’s trail.
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Another Proud Dog Moment

Hawken the Irish Wolfhound has slain another gopher.

Hawken apparently dug up and killed this pocket gopher, his second kill. I am so proud.
Hawken apparently dug up and killed this pocket gopher, his second kill. I am so proud.

Meanwhile, I’ve been baking pies for Abby. You can tell when I make pies because I make a happy face with the extra crust.

Usually, Abby bakes the pies, but I felt inspired this week. I know the happy face isn't exactly art.
Usually, Abby bakes the pies, but I felt inspired this week. I know the happy face isn’t exactly art.

Finally, Tuesday is Halloween. I have been making related pictures, but none better than at the recent Mummy and Son dance, where I photographed a mom dressed as a hot dog and her son a mustard, a mom as a burglar and her son as a State Trooper, and this image of an astronaut son and his moon mom…

Sam Holcomb and his mother Mia Holcomb dress as the "son and moon" for the City of Ada's Annual Mummy and Son Dance Thursday, Oct. 26, 2017 at Wintersmith Lodge.
Sam Holcomb and his mother Mia Holcomb dress as the “son and moon” for the City of Ada’s Annual Mummy and Son Dance Thursday, Oct. 26, 2017 at Wintersmith Lodge.
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The Tin Goose

The EAA's historic Ford Tri-Motor lumbers overhead this morning. My media friends and I got to fly in her Thursday.
The EAA’s historic Ford Tri-Motor lumbers overhead this morning. My media friends and I got to fly in her Thursday.

Readers might recall that three years ago my media cohorts and I were treated to a “media ride” on the Experimental Aircraft Association’s 1929 Ford Tri-Motor. The “Tin Goose” was in town again this week, and we took the usual media ride.

After flying in the Ford Tri-Motor, my next assignment was ECU soccer. The match started about the time of our flight, and you can see them playing in the lower left hand corner of this image.
After flying in the Ford Tri-Motor, my next assignment was ECU soccer. The match started about the time of our flight, and you can see them playing in the lower left hand corner of this image.
This view of Ada shows Arlington Street below. If you know Ada, it will be immediately familiar.
This view of Ada shows Arlington Street below. If you know Ada, it will be immediately familiar.
Photographer Wes Edens made this image of me peering out one of the huge picture windows of the Ford Tri-Motor.
Photographer Wes Edens made this image of me peering out one of the huge picture windows of the Ford Tri-Motor.

It was fun, but in all honesty, as a pilot, I’ve flown a lot of airplanes, and done a lot of crazy fun stuff in the sky, so puttering along in the world’s slowest airliner wasn’t exactly a thrill ride. Still, it’s always nice to be in the sky, and fun to meet up and do something unusual with my fellow media friends.

Sydney Gray from KXII poses with our reporter Carl Lewis and me before our ride in the Ford Tri-Motor Thursday. Among other things, images like this remind me that I am really tall.
Sydney Gray from KXII poses with our reporter Carl Lewis and me before our ride in the Ford Tri-Motor Thursday. Among other things, images like this remind me that I am really tall.
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Harmony and Hope in the Country

I love the Oklahoma sky, as in this image from earlier this month.
I love the Oklahoma sky, as in this image from earlier this month.
Abby's truck got caked with mud on the short but wild road on Aunt Judy's farm in Duncan.
Abby’s truck got caked with mud on the short but wild road on Aunt Judy’s farm in Duncan.

It’s fall on the Patch, and the weather goes between stormy and sunny, cooling off day by day.

I plastered Abby’s truck with mud at the family reunion two weeks ago, on the improvised road between Aunt Judy’s and her son Donald’s place. I personally think four-wheel-drive trucks are happiest covered in mud, but Abby wanted it clean again, so I fired up the power washer Tuesday and got both our cars clean.

I washed our vehicles Tuesday. Readers know that I love to do this, and it makes our rides look and feel like new.
I washed our vehicles Tuesday. Readers know that I love to do this, and it makes our rides look and feel like new.

The last few evenings have included amazing skies I photographed while walking Hawken the Irish Wolfhound.

Tonight while walking Hawken, I came across the Nipps, Mike and Joyce, the next door neighbors who bought Abby’s first mother-in-law Dorothy’s house, and their granddaughters Hope and Harmoni. I confuse their names because the next next-door-neighbors dogs’ are named are Hope and Harley. The girls were super-excited to play with Hawken, who is getting more comfortable with people.

Hope and Harmoni roast a stick by the fire.
Hope and Harmoni roast a stick by the fire.
Goodbye LL Bean hiking shoes. I had great times wearing you.
Goodbye LL Bean hiking shoes. I had great times wearing you.

As darkness arrived, the Nipps built a fire and girls roasted sticks. It was a nice time.

Finally, the LL Bean hiking shoes I’ve had since 2005, which I’ve been holding together with glue all summer, were finally completely used up, and I sadly threw them away.

Wheat grass in our pasture is silhouetted against the sky tonight.
Wheat grass in our pasture is silhouetted against the sky tonight.
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Why Vaccinate?

I saw a post on social media recently about the “dangers” of vaccinations. The post included the word “shocking” in the title, and contained unattributed “facts,” and major errors, including misidentifying the FDA as the “Federal Drug Administration.”

I am a vaccine proponent, and here’s why…

  • I am old enough to know polio and smallpox victims. Polio and smallpox have been eradicated by vaccines. Young people are inclined to forget just how terrifying and destructive many of these diseases were. Read about smallpox here (link), then tell me we didn’t need to vaccinate it out of existence.
  • Mumps and measles are making a resurgence, thanks to the anti-vax crowd. These are very dangerous diseases that were unheard of for much of my life because my generation came right after the period in which they made a lot of people sick, so we understood the risks.
  • Even if the illness-to-prevention ratio was 1000:1, it would still be worth the cost to protect a huge majority from serious illness. It is colossally selfish to abstain from risk at vastly increased risk for everyone else.
  • Vaccines increase herd immunity, slowing or stopping the progress of serious illness in society overall.
  • Diseases for which there is yet to be a completely successful vaccine like HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, or malaria are responsible for millions of deaths every year.
  • Vaccines are one of the seminal breakthroughs of the 20th century, and they have saved literally millions of lives and prevented untold suffering.

Before you start cackling about the “flu shot” “giving you the flu, maybe you need to try to understand that “flu” in vaccination terms is influenza, a dangerous and very specific viral upper respiratory infection. The “flu” is not that snotty, miserable cough most of us get in November, nor is the “flu” a gastric or intestinal malady.

Finally, it is difficult to reconcile a society that is often eager to blame an outside cause, fewquently the government or “big business,” for their problems: My child is disrespectful, distracted, and not very bright because of an unseen, unreported, unverified chemical from the doctor (insert chemtrail reference here if you like), not because of extensive sugar consumption, extensive inactivity, extensive electronic entertainment, and extensively indulgent, lazy, gullible parents.

An influenza vaccination might save your life and prevent the spread of a very dangerous disease, and there is little chance it will make you seriously ill. I got mine today.
An influenza vaccination might save your life and prevent the spread of a very dangerous disease, and there is little chance it will make you seriously ill. I got mine today.
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Sizing Up the All-American Dog

Hawken and I spend some quality time in front of Abby's camera this afternoon. He is a beautiful dog.
Hawken and I spend some quality time in front of Abby’s camera this afternoon. He is a beautiful dog.
Abby tugs on Hawken's ears this afternoon. "There's nothing he won't let me do to him," she said as she played with him. "There's not a mean bone in that dog's body."
Abby tugs on Hawken’s ears this afternoon. “There’s nothing he won’t let me do to him,” she said as she played with him. “There’s not a mean bone in that dog’s body.”

I told my wife Abby I wanted a picture of me playing tug-of-war with Hawken the Irish Wolfhound, since it’s his favorite thing to do with me, and since he has grown some since our last photo session.

Sierra tries to look pitiful in her teal sweater, but don't let her fool you: she is spoiled rotten.
Sierra tries to look pitiful in her teal sweater, but don’t let her fool you: she is spoiled rotten.

Before we could photograph us, Abby asked me to put a bandana on him, and we chose one of his U.S. flag bandanas. Putting one on him is an epic battle for me, since he thinks it’s a chew toy, but Abby is apparently a dog whisperer, and had no trouble at all.

It was a fun photo session that included Abby trying to “ride” Hawken for a photo but finding him too tall to mount, and Hawken stealing Abby’s water bottle to keep as a toy.

Tug-of-war is a puppy thing, and Hawken, thought huge, is still just 10 months old.
Tug-of-war is a puppy thing, and Hawken, thought huge, is still just 10 months old.
Hawken plays with his stolen water bottle.
Hawken plays with his stolen water bottle.
Shoffner reunioners are noted for their antics.
Shoffner reunioners are noted for their antics.

Afterwards I took him for his second walk of the day.

In other news, it was cold enough to put sweaters on the Chihuahuas last night. They love their sweaters, and come running when I bring them and offer to put them on.

Also, as readers hopefully saw on my teaching blog, Abby and I attended her family reunion last weekend, and shot a bunch of senior pictures for Abby’s great niece Teddy, with great success. I will post reunion photos on the travel blog shortly.

Donald Lee takes Teddy for a ride after giving one to my wife. Behind them are Abby and her nieces Amber and Rachel.
Donald Lee takes Teddy for a ride after giving one to my wife. Behind them are Abby and her nieces Amber and Rachel.
The Shoffner family photo session is a tradition. In this photo are Abby, Heather, Ryan, and Mechelle. Heather and Ryan were recently married in Las Vegas, which involved a helicopter.
The Shoffner family photo session is a tradition. In this photo are Abby, Heather, Ryan, and Mechelle. Heather and Ryan were recently married in Las Vegas, which involved a helicopter.
Abby and her niece Rachel try to look thin and fabulous for my camera at the Shoffner Family Reunion Saturday.
Abby and her niece Rachel try to look thin and fabulous for my camera at the Shoffner Family Reunion Saturday.
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Worky Thirteen

I give my wife Abby a kiss on the head as we pose for photos at her family's reunion in Duncan, Oklahoma Sunday morning. I kiss her in this fashion all the time because her hair smells like sunshine.
I give my wife Abby a kiss on the head as we pose for photos at her family’s reunion in Duncan, Oklahoma Sunday morning. I kiss her in this fashion all the time because her hair smells like sunshine.

Most of us know that 13 is often regarded as a lucky number, or conversely, as a cursed number. Some people bet on 13 in gambling, for example, while some hotels don’t even have a 13th floor.

Abby rides on a motorcycle with her cousin Donald Lee Ashford at the family reunion Saturday night.
Abby rides on a motorcycle with her cousin Donald Lee Ashford at the family reunion Saturday night.

Fear of the number 13 is triskaidekaphobia.

I can't speak for other grooms, but I found anticipating our wedding and exchanging vows with Abby as natural as anything I have ever done.
I can’t speak for other grooms, but I found anticipating our wedding and exchanging vows with Abby as natural as anything I have ever done.

I don’t consider any of this significant because, aside from an increase in 13-related mischief and mayhem as part of a feedback loop/self-fulfilling prophecy, there isn’t much about the number 13 that interests me.

I thought about all of this as my wife Abby and I arrive at our 13th wedding anniversary October 12. We exchanged vows in Utah’s iconic Delicate Arch in Arches Nation Park on a perfect morning in 2004.

This entry’s title, “Worky Thirteen,” refers to the fact that luck represents about 13 percent of the success of a marriage, and the remaining 87 percent is work, patience, trust, intimacy, work, indecision, mistakes, laughter, tears, work, heartbreak, elation, connection, and work.

I have never worked so hard at anything in my life, but I have never reaped more reward from anything in my life.

You can see the complete trip report from our wedding here (link.)

This is the quintessential wedding image from 13 years ago. It was, quite simply, a beautiful day in every respect.
This is the quintessential wedding image from 13 years ago. It was, quite simply, a beautiful day in every respect.
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Understanding, and Misunderstanding, Evil

Abby and I pose for a photo with our Chihuahuas, Sierra and Max, at the famous Welcome to Las Vegas sign in October 2011. Behind us is Mandalay Bay Hotel from which a gunman shot and killed 58 people and injured 530 more Sunday.
Abby and I pose for a photo with our Chihuahuas, Sierra and Max, at the famous Welcome to Las Vegas sign in October 2011. Behind us is Mandalay Bay Hotel from which a gunman shot and killed 58 people and injured 530 more Sunday.

There have been thousands or millions of opinions rendered since Sunday night’s mass shooting in Las Vegas. Virtually all of them have been vehement pronouncements of unassailable “truths”, such as, “This was an act of pure evil,” or, “this guy should burn in hell,” or, “we need gun control now,” or, “guns didn’t do this, a bad guy did it.”

Throughout history, human morality has been rife with immorality.
Throughout history, human morality has been rife with immorality.

They’re all wrong. I say this with a sense of irony, because I don’t know the right answer.

The problem comes from the obvious contradiction of “why,” which is a rational question asked of an irrational act. The easy, and useless, answer to “why” is that he was crazy or evil. If you found out that he was a white supremacist or an Islamic jihadist, it wouldn’t render his actions any less crazy or evil.

Until we can stop one-dimensionally hating the Las Vegas shooter (and all his ilk) and try to understand him, we are doomed to see him again and again. We can’t just write off these guys as “pure evil” without figuring them out. We have to shed this childish, “Why did the bad men fly the planes into the buildings, Daddy?” attitude.

One consistent fallacy in America is the idea that laws can deter immorality.
One consistent fallacy in America is the idea that laws can deter immorality.

Also along this line, at least one Christian leader blamed the shooting on our behavior, connecting religion, and therefore their god, to it.

“There is ‘violence in the streets,’ Pat Robertson said, because, ‘we have disrespected authority. There is profound disrespect for our president, all across this nation. They say terrible things about him. It’s in the news; it’s in other places.'” ~WP

One of the biggest obstacles to understanding irrational, seemingly evil acts, is our unwillingness, often terrified unwillingness, to admit we have that potential to go crazy or descend into evil ourselves. We all know it’s there because we all feel intense, blind rage at times, but many of us never really look in the mirrors of our souls.

Here are some additional observations about the current state of affairs…

  • Most people are not moral. Most people are self-serving.
  • Most people see the world in terms of a five mile radius and a 30-day billing cycle.
  • Most people who claim to believe in god do so because they think it will serve their causes, not because they honestly feel he is real. The rest believe it because they are told to do so.
  • Most people want money more than anything else.
  • Almost all people who type “prayers” or “praying” into comments on social media are not praying.
  • Professional athletes kneeling during the National Anthem is meaningless to me because I neither care about the opinions of professional athletes nor do I think they should be viewed as role models or heroes.
  • Most people are scared to death of almost everything every day, and though they would agree with this statement, they would say that it is “not me.”

Finally, there is a looming monster far more frightening than the wild card of angry lone nuts: North Korea. If you think 58 dead and 530 injured is a tragedy, you have forgotten the promise of the cold war: annihilation “like the world has never seen before,” at the hands of people far crazier and more evil than an angry nut with some AR15s.

The notion that innocence earns us a place without suffering is inherently flawed. "Deserve" has nothing to do with it. On the left is my grandfather Russell Barron, who was a good man his whole life, and whose life was spent in the terrible pain of arthritic disease.
The notion that innocence earns us a place without suffering is inherently flawed. “Deserve” has nothing to do with it. On the left is my grandfather Russell Barron, who was a good man his whole life, and whose life was spent in the terrible pain of arthritic disease.
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Open Mic Nyte

Your humble host speaks as the July 2017 guest artist at Open Mic Nyte.
Your humble host speaks as the July 2017 guest artist at Open Mic Nyte.

Photos were added to this entry in September 2017.

A singer/guitarist performs for the Open Mic Nyte crowd.
A singer/guitarist performs for the Open Mic Nyte crowd.

I’ve always had a soft spot for the café culture. Artists and Bohemians like Henry Miller and Jack Kerouac seemed to lead lives of densely-layered creativity. For similar reasons, I’ve always been interested in getting together with fellow writers and poets, to share and compare and express. One result of these interests is the formation of various writing groups over the years: in 1980, in 1992, and in 2000.

Open Mic Nyte participants listen as a poet reads a manuscript from 1982.
Open Mic Nyte participants listen as a poet reads a manuscript from 1982.

So when I was recently invited to join a social media group called Open Mic Nyte, I didn’t hesitate, and in June 2017 I attended my first session.

Though many people recognized me as Richard the news photographer, I told them I was just Richard.

Guest share a laugh at Open Mic Nyte.
Guest share a laugh at Open Mic Nyte.
Open Mic Nyte co-founder Sterling Jacobs recites one of his rhymes.
Open Mic Nyte co-founder Sterling Jacobs recites one of his rhymes.

One thing Open Mic Nyte co-founder (along with Steve Brogdon and Lisa M. Pyre) Sterling Jacobs emphasized is vulnerability and its value in situations like this; the willingness to be emotionally vulnerable is indispensable in expressing yourself.

I recently updated this entry to reflect my ongoing participation in this event. Watch this space for more images from Open Mic Nyte.

June 2017

I make a picture in the Open Mic Nyte live stream with event co-founder Steve Brogdon.
I make a picture in the Open Mic Nyte live stream with event co-founder Steve Brogdon.
Open Mic Nyte, June 2017
Open Mic Nyte, June 2017
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Open Mic Nyte, June 2017
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July 2017

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August 2017

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September 2017

When things got a little too serious, I decided to be the stand-up comedian of the night. I read my Wildfire poem (about my mower) and told four jokes. Everyone was glad for the levity.

This month's featured lens is my 85mm f/1.8 AF-S Nikkor. I asked Laura Brogdon to pose outside for me during the break in Open Mic Nyte.
This month’s featured lens is my 85mm f/1.8 AF-S Nikkor. I asked Laura Brogdon to pose outside for me during the break in Open Mic Nyte.
The Open Mic, Open Mic Nyte, September 2017
The Open Mic, Open Mic Nyte, September 2017
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Open Mic Nyte, September 2017
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Open Mic Nyte, September 2017
Open Mic Nyte, September 2017
Sterling Jacobs gets animated while reading a poem, Open Mic Nyte, September 2017
Sterling Jacobs gets animated while reading a poem, Open Mic Nyte, September 2017
Open Mic Nyte, September 2017
Open Mic Nyte, September 2017
Open Mic Nyte, September 2017
Open Mic Nyte, September 2017
Open Mic Nyte, September 2017
Open Mic Nyte, September 2017
Open Mic Nyte, September 2017
Open Mic Nyte, September 2017
Open Mic Nyte, September 2017
Open Mic Nyte, September 2017
Open Mic Nyte, September 2017
Open Mic Nyte, September 2017
Your humble host, Open Mic Nyte, September 2017
Your humble host, Open Mic Nyte, September 2017
Open Mic Nyte, September 2017
Open Mic Nyte, September 2017
Open Mic Nyte, September 2017
Open Mic Nyte, September 2017
Open Mic Nyte, September 2017
Open Mic Nyte, September 2017
Open Mic Nyte, September 2017
Open Mic Nyte, September 2017
Open Mic Nyte, September 2017
Open Mic Nyte, September 2017
Open Mic Nyte, September 2017
Open Mic Nyte, September 2017
Open Mic Nyte, September 2017
Open Mic Nyte, September 2017
I thought it would be fun to create an "Open Mic Nyte" logo with this microphone image, which I shot at the end of the September Open Mic Nyte.
I thought it would be fun to create an “Open Mic Nyte” logo with this microphone image, which I shot at the end of the September Open Mic Nyte.
4+

“Better Than Doughnuts”

Morning light strikes the Sky Eye Wheel, the largest portable Farris wheel in North America, at the Oklahoma State Fair Sunday.
Morning light strikes the Sky Eye Wheel, the largest portable Farris wheel in North America, at the Oklahoma State Fair Sunday.
Abby smiles for me as we prepare to spend the day at the 2017 Oklahoma State Fair.
Abby smiles for me as we prepare to spend the day at the 2017 Oklahoma State Fair.
A trainer takes her llama through an obstacle course.
A trainer takes her llama through an obstacle course.

Abby and I spent Sunday at the 2017 Oklahoma State Fair. Readers might remember that she and I did this last in 2014. Abby loves the fair, particularly the draft horses, so we attended again.

In the morning, we watched the llama show, then the donkey show.

Owners and their donkeys wait their turn to compete.
Owners and their donkeys wait their turn to compete.
Abby photographs an animal show at the Oklahoma State Fair,
Abby photographs an animal show at the Oklahoma State Fair,

The llamas were surprisingly beautiful. The donkey show was very amusing because the animals were stubborn and awkward.

At midday we got a bite, then rode the 155-feet-tall Sky Eye Wheel, the world’s largest traveling Ferris wheel. There is something inherently romantic about riding the Ferris wheel with your sweetheart.

Abby smiles from atop the Sky Eye Wheel, which is 155 feet tall and, at least from what I could tell, held together with giant cotter pins for easy assembly and disassembly. Abby was not comforted by this notion.
Abby smiles from atop the Sky Eye Wheel, which is 155 feet tall and, at least from what I could tell, held together with giant cotter pins for easy assembly and disassembly. Abby was not comforted by this notion.
Few things in the world are as empty of nutrients as funnel cake, but it was fun to eat.
Few things in the world are as empty of nutrients as funnel cake, but it was fun to eat.

I bought Abby a funnel cake on the midway, which she had never had. When I got it to her, it was still hot, and we both ate it. She said it was, “better than doughnuts.”

Abby flirts with a Belgian draft horse. To give you an idea of the size of this animal, Abby is 5 feet 7 inches tall.
Abby flirts with a Belgian draft horse. To give you an idea of the size of this animal, Abby is 5 feet 7 inches tall.
Abby asked me to photograph her with this decorative panel of animals on the midway at the fair. Abby loves animals.
Abby asked me to photograph her with this decorative panel of animals on the midway at the fair. Abby loves animals.
Abby and I spotted this ridiculous trash can cover on the midway. If you are afraid of clowns. you shouldn't have looked at it.
Abby and I spotted this ridiculous trash can cover on the midway. If you are afraid of clowns. you shouldn’t have looked at it.

We saw both classes of draft horse pull competitions, which was popular and engrossing. Abby and I found ourselves rooting for the animals to succeed. Several of the teams managed to pull sleds loaded with more than 11,000 pounds.

Draft horses and their teamsters prepare to compete in the Performance Arena. Each of these animals weighs as much 1800 pounds.
Draft horses and their teamsters prepare to compete in the Performance Arena. Each of these animals weighs as much 1800 pounds.
Draft horses pull a sled with more than 10,000 pounds of bricks on it. The competition was surprisingly engrossing.
Draft horses pull a sled with more than 10,000 pounds of bricks on it. The competition was surprisingly engrossing.
Abby plants one on me at the end of a fun day at the State Fair.
Abby plants one on me at the end of a fun day at the State Fair.

Finally, we spent the night in Oklahoma City’s Bricktown so we could go to a medical appointment Monday morning.

The sun comes up over downtown Oklahoma City.
The sun comes up over downtown Oklahoma City.
Your host fogs his reading glasses with steam from his morning coffee.
Your host fogs his reading glasses with steam from his morning coffee.
1+

Battle of the Blades

Casual readers might not know that my riding mower is named "Wildfire."
Casual readers might not know that my riding mower is named “Wildfire.”

Our riding mower has been overworked this season. It was a wet spring and a wet summer, and I mowed a lot. Even at the start of spring, the blades in the John Deere lawn tractor needed to be sharpened or changed, but the actual mowing always took precedence.

I chopped about 10 pounds of caked-on grass from the underside of the mower deck. There's no easy way to accomplish this without removing the deck from the mower.
I chopped about 10 pounds of caked-on grass from the underside of the mower deck. There’s no easy way to accomplish this without removing the deck from the mower.
The first two blade's bolts came off fairly easily. To remove the third blade, however, require welding a huge nut to it and using it to turn the bolt, which we discovered was quite rusted.
The first two blade’s bolts came off fairly easily. To remove the third blade, however, require welding a huge nut to it and using it to turn the bolt, which we discovered was quite rusted.

Finally, a dry late summer is upon us, so I managed – after about a week and four tries – the remove the deck from the mower to clean it, repair it, and replace the blades. It turned into an ironic and physically stressful event that involved three of us pulling back a spring to reattach a tension bar, and three others of us trying to remove a stubborn blade bolt, then finally welding a bigger bolt onto it so the three of us could put our strength into removing it. Lastly, we cut off the nut with a grinding tool.

The underside of the deck was somewhat rusted in general, so I painted it with some enamel left over from last summer's painting escapades, then attached the new blades.
The underside of the deck was somewhat rusted in general, so I painted it with some enamel left over from last summer’s painting escapades, then attached the new blades.

My right hamstring is sore. Apparently I am right-legged, at least when I do repair work.

The fruits of my labor may come about tonight if my repairs were successful and I am able to mow. Or, if I did it all wrong, I may check myself into the yard work insane asylum.

Update late in the day:
After a considerable amount of self-induced frustration, including including looping the engine-to-deck belt around an extra wheel (hard to see in the tangle of belts and gears under the mower), I fired her up and she mowed well. My right hamstring, on the other hand, is quite sore from the work.

Why is my mower named “Wildfire”? Find out here (link)!

In the midst of this stressful work, I took note the the porch and front yard looked amazing at sunset.
In the midst of this stressful work, I took note the the porch and front yard looked amazing at sunset.
0

Last Days of Summer

Early evening sun shines on morning glory vines on the fence in our front yard last night.
Early evening sun shines on morning glory vines on the fence in our front yard last night.
Hawken puts his paws on the fence as I work outside last night.
Hawken puts his paws on the fence as I work outside last night.

With just a few days of summer remaining, the patch is starting to change. After a very rainy June and July, it’s been a dry late summer, and the grass is turning brown. The trees, though, are healthy and huge, and the pasture is high.

I walk Hawken the Irish Wolfhound every evening. He weighed 135 pounds at the vet 10 days ago, and while he is a handful to walk, it’s good for both of us. Abby comes outside some and helps train him.

“I knew you would love an Irish Wolfhound,” Abby told me last night, “but I didn’t know you’d love him this much.”

Abby puts her arms around Hawken the Irish Wolfhound a couple of night ago. He is now nine months old and weighs 135 pounds.
Abby puts her arms around Hawken the Irish Wolfhound a couple of night ago. He is now nine months old and weighs 135 pounds.

Max, our smooth coat Chihuahua, eats like a normal dog, but Sierra, the long coat, is a piranha. Watch her stalk Max as he finishes, then clean both bowls of anything left. I made this video of them this morning…

There are several items to repair on our riding mower's deck.
There are several items to repair on our riding mower’s deck.

Last night I finally muscled the deck off the riding mower, and I now need to repair it and replace the blades. Fortunately, it is dry out and the grass isn’t growing much.

At work, my seasons are in full swing. It’s week 4 for high school football, and district matchups are about to start of baseball and softball. All the kids know me and are glad to see me, and I am shooting well.

The Sulphur High School student section yells for their Bulldogs football team Friday night as they take on the Davis Wolves in Davis.
The Sulphur High School student section yells for their Bulldogs football team Friday night as they take on the Davis Wolves in Davis.

Lastly, our life is the country is good.

Our front yard crepe myrtle bushes are high and healthy, as shown in this image yesterday evening.
Our front yard crepe myrtle bushes are high and healthy, as shown in this image yesterday evening.
1+

25 Years

Abby and I just watched Malcolm X, the 1992 Spike Lee Joint. It’s style summoned some very close-to-home memories from that dark year, so I dove into my journal.

The author sits at his desk in his apartment on E. 12th Street in Ada in the early 1990s.
The author sits at his desk in his apartment on E. 12th Street in Ada in the early 1990s.

I like to imagine these notes are like Kafka’s or Camus’, but they sometimes sound like they came from a high school girl.

These pearls only scratch the surface of what it was like for me that year, but it’s a good start…

• Return to me, and return to me what you have taken.

• Have you ever noticed that it’s the strong who think the strong should survive?

• Part of me wants her to be happy, and part of me wants her.

• I can see you in your navy peacoat, white scarf, snow melting on your glasses, under the street light.

• Sarcasm chasm.

• And yet, today, I failed to hold anyone close, tell anyone I love them, laugh, cry, have fun. What the hell am I doing?

• Tears always require imagination.

• It’s funny how the most boring people I know find me among the most boring people they know.

• Those who seem to be hiding something are usually hiding the fact that they have nothing to hide.

• Slow dance and mean it.

• Home is a moment.

• Before I go, I’d like to 1. Be famous 2. Get rich 3. Feed the world 4. Marry. Don’t be ridiculous. Who’s gonna marry me?

• If I leave, there’s no chance anyone will want me to leave.

• I’d rather eat cereal than hallucinate.

• Alone. What a wonderful word. Sometimes it’s all that needs to be said.

• I don’t want what you have. I want what you are.

• Today was made of tears.

• Misheard lyric: “The dummy between your legs.” Actual lyric: “The damage accumulates.”

• I hold myself tight because no one else will. Not even you.

• (An exhaustive list of women I dated or wanted to date, along with their best and worst characteristics.)

• I stand still and time passes through me.

• Love is an acquired taste.

• Slow-dancing with my imagination.

• “I’m really glad,” she said, not knowing how much it meant to me and how happy I was the hear her say it, “that you started coming over on Friday nights.”

• There is no place in heaven or on earth better than in my arms.

• She chants and she cries and she holds this night as sacred as I.

• We rise to the levels of strength and bravery that our lives demand.

• Somehow it means more to have someone observe than I am lonely than it does to merely be lonely.

• Most people are made up of their bad habits and broken dreams.

• How does it feel? It feels like I am in a pressure chamber, and it’s all pressing on me, making me smaller, harder. Sometimes I feel like I will disappear completely. Right now, as I sit hunched and write backhanded and yarn tearfully, I remember than no matter who or where you are, you are not thinking about me.

• Don’t go. Stay. Don’t stray.

• The future is up for grabs, and the past is up for review.

• I looked at myself in the cold, harsh, judgmental light of that damned mirror and saw so much of myself I had to look away.

• Read me like a book. I dare you.

• I can still smell her on me, the smell of perfume and tears.

• Her whole life has left her unprepared for the kind of openness I offer.

• 3:13 am. You awaken mysteriously to the sound of my voice calling your name. You hear in me my need, my gifts, my love, my life. You sit up and look around. All seems as it should.

• I sit by the window and listen as the wind chimes play the loneliest song ever written.

• Her soft voice touches me with its illusion.

• The words loomed large when she said, “I love Richard.” Never mind that the rest of the sentence was, “because he always brings cookies.”

• Maybe I was tired, or maybe it was the music, but I swear I could hardly bear the next moment.

• You keep me alive by needing me in your life. Telling you who I am is who I am.

• And you, whose caring ends the minute you walk out that door…

• Even if you have nothing to hide, don’t hide.

• The opposite of hurt is hope.

• The train to yesterday leaves tomorrow.

• Tonight the windy mist does a disappointing job hiding my tears. Miserable weather.

• When I’m with you, I’m as unlonely as I ever need to be.

• The future is our only choice.

• Bachelorhood: the freedom to joylessly masturbate to the uninspired pornography of my imagination.

• “You’re one of the most obvious people I’ve ever met.” ~M

• “Do they abandon you, or do you drive them away?” ~F

• Peace doesn’t come from what you do, but from who you are.

• If there is a god, I want to look him in the eyes. Is that the idea behind mirrors?

• Message from girlfriend on answering machine: “Meat loaf. Pot roast. Yankee pot roast. English pot roast. T-bone steak cut from the side of a cow. Round steak. Rib eye. Fillet mignon. Fried crab. Oyster on the half shell. Pork ribs. BBQ beef, dripping, glistening with sauce. McDonald’s Big Mac. Ooo, I have a deep voice. Hamburger meat, nice and lean and frying in a pan forever and ever. Chicken noodle soup. Beefy vegetable soup. …uh… (BEEP).”

• “Part of your heart you only use when you’re in love.” ~J

• A single wish: don’t let it end in tears.

• I give because I need to give.

• She cried.

• There have been hours beyond darkness in which I was totally alone.

• Good men make mistakes.

August 15, 1992: My first flying lesson.

• You awaken. The pillow is cool, but for a moment it seems like someone is there with you. It’s me.

• Silence wraps around me like a boa constrictor.

• There is nothing inside my heart that is outside my reach.

• Cool night. Footsteps on the stairs. Clouds witness my tension as I wait for Darla or Lee or the last person I’ll ever see.

• Fire and wind from the sky laugh at my frail heart as I sit in the unwelcome darkness and miss your smile.

• Missing her comes in waves. Soon they will sweep me away.

• Dressed in black, I walk the night, not among the shadows, but as the shadows.

• Sometimes it feels like if you were to cut me open, my anger and pain would flood the world.

• “Swirling toilet of despair.” ~Aria

• I have blurred visions.

• The trouble with sex with M is that you’d have to get along with her for at least a whole day, and I can’t imagine being able to do that.

• The chocolate of truth

• Perspective: use it or lose it.

• If I believed in god, I’d hate him, but my disbelief deprives me of that luxury.

• When the New Order comes, anyone uttering the word “codependent” will spend six months in a reeducation camp.

• “Hello, Richard. I just wanted to tell you that life is a tragic and terrible struggle that is made harder by the fact that as a race, we are all tragically flawed. See you this weekend. Bye.” ~David, on my answering machine

On the morning of December 20, 1992, my flight instructor signed my logbook and got out of the airplane, and I flew solo for the first time. In addition to the first giant step to becoming a pilot, it was a symbolicly high moment in my personal life. My 1992 was over.

Leanring to fly, to overcome fear, challenges, and uncertainty, marked a new chapter in my life, a chapter filled with confidence and success.
Leanring to fly, to overcome fear, challenges, and uncertainty, marked a new chapter in my life, a chapter filled with confidence and success.
1+

Today I Am a Gearhead. And Maybe Tomorrow.

I admit to being at least a little giddy about being handed a brand new iPhone 7 Plus by my newspaper this week. Although I didn’t ask for it, many on our staff had experienced shortcomings in the iPhone 6S in our hands, and yearned and lobbied for the next big step up.

My personal iPhone 7 Plus is on the left, and the new work iPhone 7 Plus assigned to me is on the right. Though they have very similar capacities, I use each very differently.
My personal iPhone 7 Plus is on the left, and the new work iPhone 7 Plus assigned to me is on the right. Though they have very similar capacities, I use each very differently.

Though neither tablet nor laptop, the “phablet” (phone+tablet) has versatility in its favor. It is a jack of all trades, including the basic need of being a phone.

Readers, particularly of more than one of my blogs, might realize that I already own an iPhone 7 Plus, and am the carrying two nearly-identical phones around every day.

Of note for this new edition to my photographic and journalistic lexicon is the camera in the 7 Plus, which is very capable. In fact, just an hour after getting set up on the phone, I made a couple of very nice images for the front page of our paper with it.

At this point it’s a mistake to say, “Oh, well if the phones are so good, why do we need cameras or even photographers?” That’s the way a 28-year-old MBA thinks, and it’s not the route to success or greatness. As tempting to say as it is that a phone made this picture, that is not the case. A photographer made this picture with this phone.

Shot with my new iPhone 7 Plus, this image was one of my successes today.
Shot with my new iPhone 7 Plus, this image was one of my successes today.
0

Rat Drowning Day

Pet Peeve...
“Drownded.” The past tense of drown is drowned. You’re grownups. Figure it out.

With a three-day weekend, my wife Abby and I are concentrating on rest and relaxation, but also are not neglecting our responsibilities.

Abby feeds Hawken the Irish Wolfhound yesterday morning. Breakfast is their special time together.
Abby feeds Hawken the Irish Wolfhound yesterday morning. Breakfast is their special time together.
Hawken plays with his new rope-pheasant this week. He immediately chewed its head off and partially buried it.
Hawken plays with his new rope-pheasant this week. He immediately chewed its head off and partially buried it.

I’ve taken Hawken the Irish Wolfhound puppy for extra-long walks, and I bathed the Chihuahuas this morning.

I’m thinking I might cook out tonight, but I might try to mow a bit. On the other hand, the forecast calls for a cooler, breezy day tomorrow, so I might spend more time outside then.

In any case, House Barron is at peace.

Max and Sierra, the Chihuahuas, had baths this morning. They don't love bathing, but they accept it. I think they look like drowned rats when they're wet.
Max and Sierra, the Chihuahuas, had baths this morning. They don’t love bathing, but they accept it. I think they look like drowned rats when they’re wet.
1+

I Won the Lottery

Few things cheer you up better than being with or watching happy people, as in this image I made of a ride at the Pontotoc County Free Fair last night.
Few things cheer you up better than being with or watching happy people, as in this image I made of a ride at the Pontotoc County Free Fair last night.

Faithful readers of the Giant Muh know how down I’ve been this week about some of my fellow photographers being laid off from their jobs at The Oklahoman. I was taking stock of this last night as I drove to my final assignment of the day (which I actually assigned myself), the Pontotoc County Free Fair.

As I worked and thought about my photographer friends, I thought about how grateful I am to have this job, and how much fun I was having doing it. People around me were happy to see me, and I was getting great images.

Then this morning as I was walking up to the Roff softball field to photograph a game, the Tupelo activity bus rolled past me and three of the softball girls yelled, “Hi, Richard!”

Also, I won the lottery. A $25,000 scratch and sniff lottery ticket was sold in Ada, but my winnings were more modest. Now the real work begins: how to invest my $14.

Deep green stage lights shine on the audience at the talent competition at this year's Pontotoc County Free Fair. I love this image, and love making pictures for a living.
Deep green stage lights shine on the audience at the talent competition at this year’s Pontotoc County Free Fair. I love this image, and love making pictures for a living.
2+

Updated: Feeling Losses

The Oklahoman, the largest newspaper in the state, in May.
The Oklahoman, the largest newspaper in the state, in May.

This item has been updated to include a scathing editorial about The Oklahoman from The Lost Ogle (link.)

Last May after I covered the Byng Pirates state championship game in Edmond, Oklahoma, I went by the offices of The Oklahoman, the state’s largest newspaper, and visited for a while with my longtime friend and fellow photographer Jim Beckel. He told me about the paper’s early-90s move to a huge, expansive and expensive facility on the Broadway extension, which for years we called “the Taj Mahal,” and the paper’s move a few years ago to a much smaller facility in the center of downtown Oklahoma City.

I stole this film-era selfie from Steve's Facebook wall. My career and Steve's are roughly contemporary.
I stole this film-era selfie from Steve’s Facebook wall. My career and Steve’s are roughly contemporary.

The move to downtown represented a cascade of downsizing at The Oklahoman, and today we learned that 35-year veteran photographers Steve Gooch and Paul Hellstern were laid off. I was a little stung by this news, though not surprised.

Steve and Paul are brilliant photographers, and I am sympathetic with their plights. So many of their photographs are like so many of mine, and I was once laid off, in 1988, so I am feeling particularly empathetic.

In my opinion, in a world of billions of not-very-good photos every day, photojournalists provide one of the last sources for truly great photography.

Finally, my friend Tracy Nicole Holman passed away today after a lengthy illness. She was young and beautiful and I was always glad to see her.

The last thing she posted to social media was, “Eating a piece of candy found in the jeans that had a run through the washer…. I’ll live, right??!!”

I am feeling very sad that she is gone. She was just 31.

Tracy Holman, whose radio DJ name was Tracy Nicole, died today. She is pictured here in 2008 holding her guitar, "Gypsy."
Tracy Holman, whose radio DJ name was Tracy Nicole, died today. She is pictured here in 2008 holding her guitar, “Gypsy.”
1+

A Big Dog and a Bigger Hurricane

Hawken hangs around with me in the pinkish evening light.
Hawken hangs around with me in the pinkish evening light.
Hawken follows me all over the yard, and never seems to get bored.
Hawken follows me all over the yard, and never seems to get bored.

News-followers might recall that the last couple of days have been dominated by news of Hurricane Harvey, an originally uninteresting tropical depression that ended up making landfall at Category 4 near Corpus Christi, Texas. As a possible consequence, our skies the last couple of nights have been a little more turbulent and a little more beautiful.

After work last night, I took Hawken, our eight-month-old Irish Wolfhound, for his evening walk. It was cooler than August evenings usually are around here, and between the green pasture turning gold and a particularly synergistic confluence of music on my iPod, I decided to take him around the perimeter a second time.

Abby and I think, probably correctly, that Hawken is a beautiful and majestic dog.
Abby and I think, probably correctly, that Hawken is a beautiful and majestic dog.

After washing out his water bowl and giving him a big drink, I decided he needed to be photographed.  Though he is 130 pounds of puppy, he believes himself to be a lapdog and wants to be constantly in contact with us, so it is difficult to photograph him without assistance. Still, I found a way, though it involved at least one giant swath of dog saliva on my camera.

The light takes on a decidedly pinkish hue as evening progresses last night. I made this with my 35mm f/1.8, a lens I recommend over and over for its ability to make this kind of subtle, elegant image.
The light takes on a decidedly pinkish hue as evening progresses last night. I made this with my 35mm f/1.8, a lens I recommend over and over for its ability to make this kind of subtle, elegant image.
This was the stormy evening sky produced by Hurricane Gustav eight years ago.
This was the stormy evening sky produced by Hurricane Gustav eight years ago.

As the evening matured, I paused to watch the sky. It reminded me of the sky we saw here in Oklahoma in 2008 as Hurricane Gustav made landfall and skirted past us to the east.

I’m not saying there is a hurricane over us, and it is not forecast to come this way, but the atmosphere is all connected, and the sky often tells me about wildness in the sky far away.

This was the sky as it crescendoed last night. Though we often have good sunset here, this particular sky has a very tropical look to it.
This was the sky as it crescendoed last night. Though we often have good sunset here, this particular sky has a very tropical look to it.
0

What to Stop Doing on Facebook

Recently, social media, particularly Facebook, has devolved from its customary shallow, vapid self into a sewer of fake news, angry lies, and complaining. As a young friend of mine commented recently, “I hate how political it all is.”

Here, then, is a list of things I want to stop doing on Facebook

  • Getting involved in political discussions of any kind. No one is enlightened in any way by my opinion, so when I give it, I am either a sycophant or an idiot, but not a scholar.
  • Trying to be clever. As cute as I think I am sometimes with my “orange you glad it’s not a banana” quips, it just adds to the nuisance chatter, and gives me follow-up notifications I don’t particularly want to see.
  • “Liking” stuff I don’t like to show that I saw it. Yes, I know Facebook added some additional styles of acknowledgment, but they all say the same thing: I saw this. No one really cares if I saw it.
  • Caring too much about who reads my stuff. This closely parallels the whole industry’s craving for success and money through counting clicks. It’s a tail-chaser.
  • Clicking on click bate. As temping as it can be sometimes to read, “12 things that will make you smell better,” it is seldom useful, and wastes my time.
  • Being hesitant to delete items I don’t like because other people have liked and commented. I need to realize that Facebook is so transient and impermanent that no one will care or even notice when I delete stuff from my wall, and that it is their responsibility to preserve their digital lives, not mine.
  • Putting my pithier thoughts on my Facebook wall instead of here. I need to make better notes and write longer, better pieces for my blog.

What do I want to do instead? Write. This blog is ideal for my kind of expression, and since I moderate comments, I can stay out of the “yes, but don’t you think” banter that doesn’t go anywhere.

Yes, I want to write more here on The Giant Muh. I will still share it to social media, but even there I will try to be diligent at deleting combative comments. It is my hope to continue to be creative, inventive and positive.

This is the most dangerous trap social media sets for us.
This is the most dangerous trap social media sets for us.
0

August Rain

As I wrote five weeks ago, we are experiencing an uncharacteristic wet period. Here on the patch, we’ve had four inches of rain so far this month, and some parts of Oklahoma have gotten 11 inches or more. Add to that the fact that it’s been unseasonably cool, and overall, it’s been a very peculiar summer.

This Oklahoma rainfall map is a patchwork of rain and more rain. To me, it's very welcome, since it's so good for the land.
This Oklahoma rainfall map is a patchwork of rain and more rain. To me, it’s very welcome, since it’s so good for the land.

I’ve been struggling with the bitterness of politics in recent days, noting that our nation and its morally bankrupt leadership is nothing new. Leaders have known since antiquity to wash the people in fear and violence and gluttony to keep them in slavery.

To that end, Abby and I watched the excellent 2012 movie Lincoln yesterday. I am caught in the middle ground of being amazed that our nation once debated the morality of owning other human beings, and being completely unsurprised that a “Christian Nation,” as today’s alt-right likes to chime, still harbors an element which doesn’t understand right from wrong.

Leviticus 25:44-46
However, you may purchase male or female slaves from among the foreigners who live among you.  You may also purchase the children of such resident foreigners, including those who have been born in your land.  You may treat them as your property, passing them on to your children as a permanent inheritance.  You may treat your slaves like this, but the people of Israel, your relatives, must never be treated this way.

The Bible, ladies and gentlemen.

It is with this between my ears that I work outside on these cool days, trying to keep up with a forest of grass in the yards and pastures, feeling angry with the people of our land, and so very happy with the trees and wildflowers and sunsets of that same land.

Rain clings to Abby's peace rose this morning.
Rain clings to Abby’s peace rose this morning.
1+

Mowin’ the Sticker Patch

One of the crepe bushes in our front yard shines in late afternoon sun last night. Abby and I planted these nearly 10 years ago.
One of the crepe bushes in our front yard shines in late afternoon sun last night. Abby and I planted these nearly 10 years ago.
For last night's imaging, I grabbed by 15-year-old Minolta DiMage 7i. Despite its antiquity, it gives a look I have always loved, particularly in the evening.
For last night’s imaging, I grabbed by 15-year-old Minolta DiMage 7i. Despite its antiquity, it gives a look I have always loved, particularly in the evening.

Summers are shorter. When I was a kid, they seemed like three long months of building dams in the creek and eating Cheez-Its. That might still be true for a handful of reclusive nerds, but if you are into anything at all, like athletics or student publications, you had about ten minutes of summer vacation.

A memory from childhood that is a sign of August: cicada skins.
A memory from childhood that is a sign of August: cicada skins.

My summers are short in terms of activities, but right now, the top of August, is very slow. That will come to an end shortly; my first high school sports media day, Ada softball, is tomorrow, after which it is, in effect, fall.

Though most of them are at the end of their lives, the Rose-of-Sharon lining our driveway still make a few gorgeous blooms like this one last night.
Though most of them are at the end of their lives, the Rose-of-Sharon lining our driveway still make a few gorgeous blooms like this one last night.
Hawken the Irish Wolfhound gives me his equivalent of a handshake, a slobbery mouth on the wrist.
Hawken the Irish Wolfhound gives me his equivalent of a handshake, a slobbery mouth on the wrist.

This August is being unseasonably cool. There are no 90ºs in the current forecast. I’ve been taking advantage of that by working outside. With decent rainfall, mowing is a repeated necessity; keeping the grass spurs in check is extra-important since I am walking Hawken the Irish Wolfhound every day.

My efforts over the years to shape our small patch of the world have paid off. Trees we planted years ago are huge and healthy. Flowers are blooming. Grass is green.

Who I work outside during evenings like last night, I am profoundly grateful for our lives here on our green patch in Byng, Oklahoma.
Who I work outside during evenings like last night, I am profoundly grateful for our lives here on our green patch in Byng, Oklahoma.
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Summer Slowdown and Stupid Questions

My Nissan Juke and Abby's Nissan Frontier sit in the driveway after I washed and dried them. They look like new.
My Nissan Juke and Abby’s Nissan Frontier sit in the driveway after I washed and dried them. They look like new.
I spotted this at a Sunday school classroom recently. I know the spelling isn't right, but I thought Abby would get a kick out of it.
I spotted this at a Sunday school classroom recently. I know the spelling isn’t right, but I thought Abby would get a kick out of it.

A buddy asked me the other day if I had posted anything on my site. He hadn’t seen anything. The answer was that yes, I had, but just a couple of items. I expect that he hadn’t seen them because, like a lot of us, we use social media as site readers, expecting to see links to our favorite stuff in our feeds. Recently, though, several people had indicated they aren’t seeing my stuff consistently, which doesn’t surprise me.

I see less content in general in the summer. The optimist in me hopes this is because people are outside.

So, what’s going on?

  • This is Michael and Thea's old house. (Insert joke here about it or the neighborhood being a toilet.)
    This is Michael and Thea’s old house. (Insert joke here about it or the neighborhood being a toilet.)

    Michael and Thea recently moved from Norman, Okla., to Oklahoma City, to a larger house, and to a location closer to their works. I’m happy for them, but I don’t admire the “interstate culture” that involves constantly using interstate highways every time you need a loaf of bread. My role in their move was to use Abby’s Nissan Frontier pickup to move a new dining set and a new huge-screen television from the store to their new home. The Visio television was interesting: it is a 65-inch flat screen with the option of using a phone app as the remote control.

This is Michael and Thea's new house in south Oklahoma City. In addition to being a bigger, nicer house, it cuts their daily commute to work in half.
This is Michael and Thea’s new house in south Oklahoma City. In addition to being a bigger, nicer house, it cuts their daily commute to work in half.
  • This is the 2017 Nissan Juke Ada Nissan lent me. It's a nice car, but the dark blue reaffirmed my love of white cars, as it was untouchably hot sitting in the afternoon sun.
    This is the 2017 Nissan Juke Ada Nissan lent me. It’s a nice car, but the dark blue reaffirmed my love of white cars, as it was untouchably hot sitting in the afternoon sun.

    I had a big 48,000-mile service on my Nissan Juke, including oil, transmission fluid, air filters for the engine and the cabin, tire rotation and more. Props to Ada Nissan for getting the work done quickly, and for lending me another Juke, no charge.

  • My wife Abby and I finished the quilt squares her aunt Judy asked us all to make for the next family reunion. The whole family was asked to decorate these squares, which Judy plans to make into a giant quilt and raffle off at the reunion in October. Abby and I took our squares – with pictures of family stuff – to Duncan last weekend, where we had lunch and fed the deer.
Abby and I used a fairly inexpensive transfer product to put photos on these quilt squares for the reunion quilt.
Abby and I used a fairly inexpensive transfer product to put photos on these quilt squares for the reunion quilt.
  • I've cut a lot of grass with this mower, since the first summer Abby and I were dating. It seems to give up once in a while, only to come back to life with some care.
    I’ve cut a lot of grass with this mower, since the first summer Abby and I were dating. It seems to give up once in a while, only to come back to life with some care.

    My push lawn mower has decided to be vexingly inconsistent. I was certain 10 days ago I was on the verge of buying a new one, but when I cranked it the last time, it started on the second pull. Ghost in the machine.

  • I cranked up the power washer and washed my Juke and Abby’s Frontier, which always re-reminds me how much more we love our vehicles when they’re super-clean.
  • I just finished teaching another intermediate/advance photography class. We had a great time. At one point, one of my students asked, “Is there and advanced advanced after this?” which I consider very flattering.
  • One of my reporters and I covered a story about a firefighter who delivered a baby by the side of the road recently, and we both noted how cringingly stupid tv reporters’ questions are. “How does it feel to deliver a baby like this?” It’s like being punched in the groin, Sylvia. “Is there anything your want to say to the firefighters who delivered your baby?” Yeah, perv, get out of my coochie.
It's hard to believe based on his appearance, but Hawken the Irish Wolfhound is still a puppy.
It’s hard to believe based on his appearance, but Hawken the Irish Wolfhound is still a puppy.
  • Max the Chihuahua, who is now completely deaf, dug out of the front yard for the first time in a couple of years. I was very proud, though, when I caught up with him, that he followed me back to the house without a leash or picking him up. Hawken the Irish Wolfhound is off the charts lovable. Sierra the Chihuahua is fine, and eats her breakfast and dinner in about three seconds. She’s also been eating a lot of sh!t lately. Bad girl.

All is well. Abby was briefly very ill, but we got her fixed up. Later this morning I hope to make her cottage cheese eggs.

The magnetic dry erase board in the kitchen has been replaced by the Reminders app on our iPhones, so it's just for-fun art now.
The magnetic dry erase board in the kitchen has been replaced by the Reminders app on our iPhones, so it’s just for-fun art now.
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More Fun Facts…

When it comes to tea, dryer is better.
When it comes to tea, dryer is better.
  • If your tea doesn’t taste right, it might be because it is what connoisseurs call “too wet.” To fix this, just add a dryer sheet when steeping! Try it!
  • The new iPhone 7x allows you to charge the device in a microwave oven. Try it!
  • When Author “Fonzie” Fonzarella jumped over the tank of sharks in the fourth season of Happy Days, all of the sharks and 52 migrant workers were killed.
  • It is impossible to photography distant objects with fast shutter speeds because light only travels 186 miles in 1/1000th of a second.
  • All my towels are named Thurston Towel III.
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Worms on a Stick at the Fungus Farm

This is a delicious, nutritious sandwich I made with cucumbers, onions, tomatoes, spinach, cheese, and mustard on a whole wheat roll.
This is a delicious, nutritious sandwich I made with cucumbers, onions, tomatoes, spinach, cheese, and mustard on a whole wheat roll.

My wife Abby spotted some nice whole wheat sub sandwich rolls at Wal Mart the other day, so much of this week’s dining has been in one iteration or another of sandwich.

Stick it into the web, give it a twist, then pull, and out comes the web and the worms that made it. I made this tool from a broom handle and a shelf bracket.
Stick it into the web, give it a twist, then pull, and out comes the web and the worms that made it. I made this tool from a broom handle and a shelf bracket.

After dinner tonight, I tried to devise an apparatus for removing webworms from hard-to-reach branches of trees on the patch. Every Oklahoman knows these ugly parasites that weave thick, sticky webs on hardwood trees while consuming all the green within. The webs are tough enough that the birds can’t get to them, so I decided to fashion a stick with a metal tool on the end – a shelf bracket, actually – that would allow me to stick-twist-pull to remove the mess from the branches I could not otherwise reach, and it worked pretty well.

Later when I was mowing near the old walnut tree, I came across a lovely, funny stand of mushrooms that I’d never seen before, and photographed them.

Nothing indicates a healthy ecosystem like a stand of mushrooms like this one under our walnut tree tonight.
Nothing indicates a healthy ecosystem like a stand of mushrooms like this one under our walnut tree tonight.

Also, today was the Stratford Peach Festival, and while the local farms didn’t have much to offer, I was able to secure some from nearby Sallisaw, which are quite tasty. I bought a very large bag of them and in addition to eating them fresh, I’m sure Abby will make a cobbler.

Colorful, ripe, nutritious and delicious, the Sallisaw peaches were for sale today in Stratford at the Peach Festival.
Colorful, ripe, nutritious and delicious, the Sallisaw peaches were for sale today in Stratford at the Peach Festival.
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Extra Large but Not Wide

I wear shoes every day, all year long. These are the new shoes I got for my birthday this year.
I wear shoes every day, all year long. These are the new shoes I got for my birthday this year.

For my birthday, Abby agreed to let me order new shoes from Zappos.com. (Before you ask me why I didn’t buy locally, ask the locals why the same shoes are 20% more.) I got a pair of  brown New Balance casual walking shoes for everyday wear in my office casual environment at work, and another pair of Merrill Moab 2 Ventilators. I got my first pair of Moab’s because of the name: Abby and I got married in Moab, Utah, but that led to the discovery that these are best shoes I’ve ever owned.

I have the healthiest feet of anyone I know. My feet never hurt and they are anatomically ideal. I don’t require wide sizes or insole inserts of any kind. I wear shoes all day, every day, all year long. It’s possible the shoe companies are sneaking in at night to measure my feet and make shoes exactly for them.

Hawken's idea of posing for a portrait is to tackle me and slobber all over me. The shoes look good, though, right?
Hawken’s idea of posing for a portrait is to tackle me and slobber all over me. The shoes look good, though, right?

Also among the huge and the healthy is Hawken, our six month old Irish Wolfhound. Ten days ago he weighed in at 108 pounds, so he is still growing, but he is well and loves us to pieces. Abby has taken to putting bandanas on him. Last night I tried, but he wants to play with the bandana as a toy, so it’s really a two-person job. Once we got his Harley Davidson bandana on him, I asked Abby to make a few pictures of us, which was particularly fun when he decided to knock me down and cover me in huge-tongue dog slobber.

I finally got Hawken to pose for this image by rubbing his belly.
I finally got Hawken to pose for this image by rubbing his belly.
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“The Bloodbath”

I thought this image of myself reflected in downtown windows at dusk was dreamlike.
I thought this image of myself reflected in downtown windows at dusk was dreamlike.

My wife Abby and I both awoke thinking we heard whistling. She even seemed to hear a tune being whistled, which was too weird to ignore.

I got my Ruger P95 9mm, which has a Streamlight on it, and swept the house for intruders.

“Is it clear?” she asked when I came back to bed. Of course it was, I explained, since if I had found a home invader, I would be holding him at gunpoint and asking Abby to cover the sector behind me and call 911.

Maybe that’s an important difference city life and country living: in the city, you might threaten a potential assailant with a call to the police or to scream, where in the county, we tend to offer the choice between surrender or death, since we know the police could take as much as 30 minutes to arrive.

I was even able to determine that Hawken, the back yard Irish Wolfhound, was fine when I looked through the blinds at him eating some kibble.

We speculated the whistling could have been an owl, a dove, the cuckoo clock, the police scanner, or a dog tummy, but Abby swears it was a tune. None of the dogs reacted to the sound in any way, so my best guess is that one of us, probably me, was dreaming about whistling and whistling out loud.

Back in bed, I dreamed  I was a dog handler at a wedding, in charge of a giraffe-sized Irish Wolfhound. A one point, he felt faint, so I game him a bowl of elbow macaroni and milk.

Those thoughts are from last night.

Yesterday on the way to the grocery, Abby and I got to reminiscing about a recent nail-clipping disaster with Sierra the Chihuahua. I told Abby about the mistakes I made when doing it, and to clarify, she asked, “Was the ‘the bloodbath’?” We laughed and laughed at that, since we now have an event in our lives we will remember as The Bloodbath.

This is a t-shirt I used to try to clean up the blood from our nail-trimming fiasco in November, known from now on as The Bloodbath.
This is a t-shirt I used to try to clean up the blood from our nail-trimming fiasco in November, known from now on as The Bloodbath.
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July Rain

The moon slides over the top of a small, brief thunderstorm in Byng two nights ago.
The moon slides over the top of a small, brief thunderstorm in Byng two nights ago.
Hawken and I play together in the back yard a couple of weeks ago.
Hawken and I play together in the back yard a couple of weeks ago.

As usual, I had a super-fun time covering Independence Day celebrations in Ada’s Wintersmith Park Tuesday. The weather was nice and everyone had a great time.

It rained 3.1 inches Monday, then 1.5 inches early Wednesday morning, then another half inch right on top of us and nowhere else in there state, just as I was about to walk Hawken the Irish Wolfhound two nights ago.

A raindrop clings to barbed wire on the chicken coop, which we have despite not owning chickens.
A raindrop clings to barbed wire on the chicken coop, which we have despite not owning chickens.
The runt crepe myrtle in the front yard, which we once presumed dead, has huge, healthy blossoms on it this year.
The runt crepe myrtle in the front yard, which we once presumed dead, has huge, healthy blossoms on it this year.

Everything was browning just a bit, but is now turning green again, and growing fast, so I am experiencing a burst of outdoor work.

My wife Abby and I gave Hawken a bath in the front yard yesterday, then took him to the vet,  where he weighed 108 pounds, which is typical for his breed at his age, six months. He is a mess, but he loves us both.

Raindrops cling to a Rose-of-Sharon bush in our back yard. It is our only remaining healthy Rose-of-Sharon, though it was eaten to near-death by our goats years ago.
Raindrops cling to a Rose-of-Sharon bush in our back yard. It is our only remaining healthy Rose-of-Sharon, though it was eaten to near-death by our goats years ago.
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