Sore Arms and Unfriending Jerks

This is written on the back cover of the journal of a high school friend of mine. I won't dispute its veracity.
This is written on the back cover of the journal of a high school friend of mine. I won’t dispute its veracity.

I recently “unfriended” someone on one of the popular social media platforms.  I knew him in college from our mutual darkroom use in Copeland Hall at Oklahoma University. I didn’t like him all that much then. Among other things, he suffered from the Dunning-Kruger effect, a cognitive bias in which people of low ability have illusory superiority and mistakenly assess their cognitive ability as greater than it is.

On this occasion I ended our social media relationship because he is one of those people who try to score off of your mistakes in the comments section of your posts, smarting off and trying to make you look foolish in the process. They think it makes them look smart and cool, but it actually just makes them look like insecure assholes.

Unfriending them won’t educate them in any way, but it will end their constant parade of smart-assery. It’s my social media page, after all.

Also of note, I reconnected with a high school acquaintance, a former cheerleader named Stacey, who I like and respect, and who opened up to me. It’s nice to talk to people like her; she is the polar opposite of the people I unfriended.

In other, less annoying news, Abby and I got our flu shots this week. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: influenza vaccinations can’t give you the flu, and if you get sick after one, you were either unlucky, or, in most cases, don’t really have flu. What most people don’t seem to understand is that influenza is only one of the constellation of wintertime illnesses you can get, and most of those diseases aren’t flu. The true giveaways for flu are sudden onset, fever of at least 101º, and a dry cough that becomes productive accompanied by back pain. Flu is not “stomach flu,” and it’s not a head cold or a strep infection. Sometimes doctors tell people they have the flu so they can get them out of their offices. Influenza is very dangerous, and if you have it, you will be very sick. Stop saying you have the flu.

I am thinking about this today because this year’s vaccine packs a punch, such that it made my arm very sore at the injection site. I kind of like this, as it reminds me that the vaccine is prompting an immune response.

I posted this photo Tuesday night. My friend Jeanie shot it for me. Lots of people saw it and liked it, but one jerkoff had to make yet another smart-ass comment at my expense, and it was the last strike for him.
I posted this photo Tuesday night. My friend Jeanie shot it for me. Lots of people saw it and liked it, but one jerkoff had to make yet another smart-ass comment at my expense, and it was the last strike for him.
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4 Comments

  1. Totally agree about having the flu and getting vaccinated. The last time I had the flu was in 2009, and it was miserable. I was out for 11 days. I’ve made it a point to get my yearly vaccination ever since.

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  2. Thanks for the sincere flattery 😉 It has been one year since I’ve entertained any connections with toxic folks, from my past, and it’s been a great blessing! Starting over, at my age, has many struggles and challenges, but I’ve made some awesome discoveries ! I’m am still, a work in progress” learning bravery, strength, love and kindness are all alive, thriving , passionately, inside my soul!! 🌻💗😎
    I’m Soooo proud of ME!
    Ps thanks for being my eclectic friend

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  3. “…he suffered from the Dunning-Kruger effect…”

    I often worry that I have this. Though I think that means I don’t have it. But…

    Also, good for you getting your shots.

    (“This is Richard. Richard got his flu shot. Be more like Richard.”)

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