Fires, Freezes, Big Dogs and Tiny Dogs

The barbed wire that has been tangled atop a fence post at the gate to the south pasture since I have been living here gives form to last night's vanishing light.
The barbed wire that has been tangled atop a fence post at the gate to the south pasture since I have been living here gives form to last night’s vanishing light.
Summer Time Lane sits in Abby's lap last night. At the vet, she officially weighed 6 pounds 14 ounces.
Summer Time Lane sits in Abby’s lap last night. At the vet, she officially weighed 6 pounds 14 ounces.

Yesterday I took Summer the Chihuahua to have her microchip installed, then to my office so my coworkers could fall in love with her, which they did.

Last night was one of the most beautiful spring nights I can remember. It was cool and breezy, and the sky had an immense clarity to it.

I worked outside, first with my electric chain saw, then with the weed whacker, then with a shovel as I attempted to dig out the last roots of the dead Rose-of-Sharon bushes. Elm saplings have already colonized those spots, so I think I will let them grow.

Tiny leaves sprout from our Shumard oak tree last night. The light was magnificent, so I called upon my 35mm f/1.8 to make this image.
Tiny leaves sprout from our Shumard oak tree last night. The light was magnificent, so I called upon my 35mm f/1.8 to make this image.
Max gawks at me from the living room floor. He seems perfectly happy to have a new Chihuahua in the house.
Max gawks at me from the living room floor. He seems perfectly happy to have a new Chihuahua in the house.

Finally in for the night, I got a glass of wine and sat on the porch while Summer continued to get comfortable. Some dogs take a little while to settle in, but Summer seems to have found herself a new home like she was born to be with us.

She played in the yard as I watched. Max joined us a time or two. After I was in for a bit, I saw Summer in Abby’s lap, but neither of us let her in, meaning she figured out how to use the dog door.

Hawken the Irish Wolfhound and I still walk at least a mile a day. Last night I introduced him to Summer, and both animals were agreeable. By my calculations, Hawken weighs almost exactly 25 times what Summer weighs.
Hawken the Irish Wolfhound and I still walk at least a mile a day. Last night I introduced him to Summer, and both animals were agreeable. By my calculations, Hawken weighs almost exactly 25 times what Summer weighs.
One of my more strenuous projects last night was digging up the remaining roots of the last of the Rose-of-Sharon bushes that once lined our driveway. The roots go deep and are very tangled, so there is a lot of digging and prying.
One of my more strenuous projects last night was digging up the remaining roots of the last of the Rose-of-Sharon bushes that once lined our driveway. The roots go deep and are very tangled, so there is a lot of digging and prying.
When they needed a new level of danger, they added "historic" to their lexicon. I wonder what would be above that?
When they needed a new level of danger, they added “historic” to their lexicon. I wonder what would be above that?

The forecast for Oklahoma is dire. I thought the weather service’s highest level of fire danger was “Extreme,” but it looks like they are taking it to the next level for tomorrow, “Historic.”

I also see we are expecting a light freeze Saturday night, so I need to take steps to protect the garden. Usually a heavy watering does the trick, but I as we get closer to the day and the forecast includes a freeze warning, I’ll probably cover them with something.

Few of my outdoor evenings are complete without photographing something, so I grabbed my Nikon D7100 and the amazing 35mm f/1.8, and walked around at last light, making pictures.

One of my tomato plants shines at last light.
One of my tomato plants shines at last light.
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3 Comments

  1. Beautiful. Glad Summer Lane is making a home. Hawken alone would be worth the trip to Ada. And that 35mm, what a reliable lens it is!

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  2. Plastic bins, garbage cans, and the like make the perfect freeze covering for your tender young veggie plants. Much more reliable than any kind of cloth. Empty gallon jugs, 2-liter soda bottles, and large mason jars can work too. If just for over night, even large cooking pots can suffice.

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