The Favor from the Skies

I have several varieties of peaches, so I expect to have ripe ones for some time starting in late June.
I have several varieties of peaches, so I expect to have ripe ones for some time starting in late June.
The west pasture is full of wildflowers, including this Indian Paintbrush.
The west pasture is full of wildflowers, including this Indian Paintbrush.

Our patch of green in southeast Oklahoma has been getting abundant rain. People are already complaining about it on social media, and it makes them look selfish and short-sighted. We need rain in a very fundamental way; the land on which we live can only sustain us if there is rain. But waa waa on Facebook because soccer moms have to walk to their cars in the Wal Mart parking lot in the rain. Idiots.

Since cherry trees grow slower than, say, peaches, I haven't really had a cherry harvest yet. This year could be it.
Since cherry trees grow slower than, say, peaches, I haven’t really had a cherry harvest yet. This year could be it.

The chance of a freeze now is quite small, which means that I will likely have peaches, plums, and cherries from my orchard, and tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers, cantaloupe, and squash from the garden.

There is more rain in the forecast, and I am very glad. The slight inconvenience is more than worth it to have our land green and healthy.

My tomato plants are growing and healthy, and I have only watered the garden once. That's how it should be.
My tomato plants are growing and healthy, and I have only watered the garden once. That’s how it should be.
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2 Comments

  1. I feel the same about rain, except when it goes on for so many days that my garden starts whining for sunshine. A solid week of rain is good for at least three inches of plant growth.

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  2. I’ve spent a good part of my life in drought-prone dusty areas, so it’s always bugged me when people complain about the rain, especially in those areas, and especially in the middle of a drought.

    And even more especially when their complaint is that they had planned to golf that day, when their golf course uses half a million gallons of water per day, leaving the aquifer far lower than it should be, even when we’re not short on rain.

    (Caveat: our local golf course has recently switched to using “gray water”, and I’ve heard others have too. Still…)

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