Magazine vs Clip vs People Who Don’t Know the Difference

In a story today from the Associated Press, as in dozens of previous stories, we read this language:

Similarly, Rep. Carolyn McCarthy (D) of New York is seeking to ban the extended ammunition clips that allegedly were used in the rampage. With fewer bullets in each clip, attackers would have to reload more frequently, allowing time for them to be subdued.

I have just one thing to say. The box that holds the bullets that you insert into a pistol is call the magazine, not the “clip.”

Update: My sister commented on this entry with a good question, “And what is a clip?” The entry, of course, isn’t about firearms knowledge, but about ill-informed news reporting, but I should nevertheless relay exactly what a clip is and what a magazine is…

The is a magazine for a modern 9mm pistol. A magazine is designed to hold the ammunition in the pistol, feeding the rounds into it as it is fired. Once empty, the magazine can be refilled with bullets and used again.
This is a magazine for a modern 9mm pistol, photographed on a mirror. A magazine is designed to hold the ammunition in the pistol, feeding the rounds into it as it is fired. Once empty, the magazine can be refilled with bullets and used again. In weapons like many hunting rifles, the magazine is the portion of the gun that holds the rounds before they are fired. Thus some weapons have removable magazines, and some do not.
This is a clip for the .30 caliber military M1 "Garand" rifle of World War II vintage. The clip holds the bullets together while they are inserted into the magazine. In the case of the Garand, the clip stays inside the rifle until the last round is fire, at which time it is ejected by the follower. Some rifle clips, like those for the Springfield 1903 rifle, are ejected and discarded as soon as the rounds are fed into the weapon. In either case, the clip is not intended to be reused.
This is a clip for the .30 caliber military M1 “Garand” rifle of World War II vintage. The clip holds the bullets together while they are inserted into the magazine. In the case of the Garand, the clip stays inside the rifle until the last round is fire, at which time it is ejected by the follower. Some rifle clips, like those for the Springfield 1903 rifle, are ejected and discarded as soon as the rounds are fed into the weapon. In either case, the clip is not intended to be reused.
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