2017: The Year in Pictures

January

Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
An Ada firefighter prepares to spray water on the burning roof of a house on fire in the 1900 block of Fulkerson in Byng Thursday morning, Jan. 12, 2017. Several agencies were called to assist Byng Fire Department in containing the blaze.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Firefighters move a water hose into position to fight a house fire in the 1900 block of Fulkerson in Byng Thursday morning, Jan. 12, 2017.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Grace Anderson ducks as she plays in a fund raising dodgeball tournament to benefit accident victim Avery Anderson Saturday, Jan. 14, 2017 at the Cougar Activity Center.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
An Ada firefighter scambles to extinguish an area of tall grass ablaze during a wildfire in northeast Ada Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2017. The fire was in a heavily wooded area bounded by Lonnie Abbott Boulevard, Arlington Street, L Street and Monte Vista Road. Emergency crews from several agencies were called to help extinguish the blaze.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News

February

Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Kaitlyn Blankenship and Aly Forneris dress as a chicken and a cow respectively for the Ada Lady Cougars and Cougars basketball matchups with McAlester Tuesday night, Jan. 31, 2017 at the Cougar Activity Center.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Second grader Channing Ballard performs with her Cougann Clinic classmates during Avery Anderson night Friday, Feb. 10, 2017 at the Cougar Activity Center.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Retiring East Central University President Dr. John Hargrave presents roses to his wife Kay at a dinner marking the retirement Friday night, Feb. 17, 2017 at ECU’s Chickasaw Business and Conference Center and Harland C. Stonecipher School of Business.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News

March

Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Sluggo the Bulldog keeps an eye on Byng Pirate baseball Saturday, March 4, 2017 at the school.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Maddie Bacon and her Ada High School classmates cheer for the Lady Cougars as they take on Classen SAS in first-round Class 4A state tournement play Thursday night, March 9, 2017 at the State Fairgrounds Arena in Oklahoma City. Ada defeated Classen 47-45 to advance to the semi-finals.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Brandy Kaeshoefer, owner of The Grandview Event Center in downtown Ada, March 9, 2017.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
A damaged passenger car sits in the roadway at the scene of a two-vehicle injury accident on Francis Road approximately five miles west of Allen Tuesday evening, March 21, 2017.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Abbie Yates has her face painted by Kami Choat at a pancake dinner and raffle Tuesday night, March 21, 2017 at Ada High School. The event was held to support Avery Anderson and her family. Anderson was seriously injured in a July 2016 crash and remains hospitalized.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Ada firefighter trainee Tanner Quinlan rolls out a length of hose during a training exercise near Lazer Zone Wednesday, March 22, 2017.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Macy Parks watches softball at the annual Beast of the East softball tournament Saturday, March 25, 2017 in Stonewall.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Ada Lady Cougar senior Maddie Jessepe can’t hold back her tears as she hugs head coach Christie Jennings in the last few seconds of the team’s semifinal matchup against Harrah Friday, March 10, 2017 in Oklahoma City, The Lady Cougars lost 44-31, ending their bid for the championship.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News

April

Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Videographer Taylor Johnson smiles as she shoots video at Pontotoc Technology Center Tuesday evening, April 11, 2017. The school hosted it first annual signing day for high school students who are accepted to PTC for the 2017-18 school year.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Ruth Landrum laughs as she and her daughter Finley Landrum enjoy the annual Rotary Pancake Fry Wednesday, April 12, 2017 at the new Central Fire Station.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Cory West checks out the fountain in front of the Haley Brown Ford Fine Arts Center during East End Eats Thursday, April 6, 2017 at East Central University’s Centennial Plaza.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Avery Howard takes in the signs, sounds and smells of East End Eats Thursday, April 6, 2017 at East Central University’s Centennial Plaza.

May

Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Environmental biotechnology graduate candidate Shannon Kerr glances at a friend as she participates in graduation ceremonies Tuesday evening, May 2, 2017 at Pontotoc Technology Center.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Lee Ann Gray’s sixth grade class at Willard Grade Center uses a blacklight to examine Petri dishes with samples of microorganisms collected from various locations around the school Wednesday, May 10, 2017, as part of Gray’s Ada City Schools Foundation Grant “Where the Wild Things Grow.”
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Ely Jonka runs an obstacle course Tuesday, May 9, 2017 at Hayes Grade Center. It was “Boot Camp Day” at the school.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
A group of East Central University students photograph themselves as they wait in line to enter the Kerr Activities Center Saturday, May 16, 2017 for afternoon graduation ceremonies.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Graduate candidates make their way from Ada High School’s student center to the Cougar Activity Center for graduation ceremonies Tuesday, May 16, 2017.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Pontotoc County worker Larry Peterson uses an arcwelder to reattach a guardrail on old State Highway 3 south of Stonewall Friday morning, May 19, 2017. The rail was damaged when a severe thunderstorm blew a large tree down on it Thursday night.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Vanoss High School graduate candidates Honey Bushnell, Heather Burks, Kaylee Grim, and Briley Crowell smile for a photo Friday night, May 19, 2017 during commencement exercises at ECU’s Kerr Activities Center.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Latta High School senior Coleman King leads his class is the Pledge of Allegiance during commencement ceremonies Tuesday, May 23, 2017 at Latta Panther Field House.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News

June

Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Sonya Stokes and Lisa Blevins hug at the Relay for Life of Pontotoc County 2017 fundraising event of the American Cancer Society Friday night, June 16, at the Pontotoc County Agri-Plex.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Scouts Braden Martin, Jackson Cook, and Michael Muse lead the flag salute at the Relay for Life of Pontotoc County 2017 fundraising event of the American Cancer Society Friday night, June 16, at the Pontotoc County Agri-Plex.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Vietnam veteran James Pippen salutes as he holds a candle during an Ada Indivisible candlelight vigil protesting impending changes in health care legislation Wednesday, June 28, 2017 in Ada’s Juliana Park.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Briley Humphers and her uncle Scott Odom admire a fish they caught at Take a Kid Fishing Day Saturday, June 3, 2017 at the Ada Elks Lodge.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
ECU assistant men’s basketball coach Aaron Hill organizes a very large group selfie during end-of-day exercises at Ada First Baptist sports camp Wednesday, June 28, 2017 at ECU’s Norris Field.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
In this view looking west from the U.S. 377/SH3W overpass, Ada Police lead a long procession of public safety and personal vehicles from Ada First Baptist Church to Swan Hill Cemetery Tuesday, June 27, 2017 for the funeral of former Ada Police D.A.R.E. Officer and EMT Phillip Wood.

July

Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Ayzia Booth practices giving her father Jesse Booth a shave with whipped cream during kids games Tuesday, July 4, 2017 in Wintersmith Park.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Jack Tornio adjusts his glasses after being doused wit colored paint during the kids games Tuesday, July 4, 2017 in Wintersmith Park.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Children push giant inflatable turtles in a turtle race during the kids games Tuesday, July 4, 2017 in Wintersmith Park.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Motorcyclists and police officers line up to escort runners in the 50th Annual Fireball Classic half-marathon, 10k , and 5k race Tuesday morning, July 4, 2017 in Wintersmith Park.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Dressed as a peach, Trisha Wood dances in the Stratford Round Up Club’s Peach Festival Parade Thursday, July 13, 2017 in downtown Stratford.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Work continues on Mama T’s homeless shelter on 12th Street Wednesday, July 19, 2017.

August

Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Morning sunlight streams through trees Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017 in Byng.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Michael Hicks takes his turn blowing the horn on an Oil Center fire truck at a free school supply givaway program Saturday, Aug. 5, 2017 at the Pontotoc County Agri-Plex. Harmony Church organized the event, which was free and open to students in pre-kindergarten through 12th grade, as well as home-schooled children.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
The sky takes on brilliant color at the Coalgate vs Valliant football game Friday, Aug. 25, 2017 at the Coalgate High School football field. The Wildcats defeated Valliant 42-40 to win the season-opener.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News — Lauren Rose chats with her hen Goldie Thursday, Aug. 31, 2017 at the Pontotoc County Free Fair.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News
Melanie Thomsen, mother of Tovan Thomsen.
Richard R. Barron/The Ada News

Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —

September

Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
Amelia Holtzmann wears pink sparkle makeup for “Pink Out Night” duriing pregame activities at the Ada football matchup against Bethany Friday night, Sept. 22, 2017 at Norris Field. The Cougars defeated the Bronchos 35-28.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
Kaitlin Blankenship tries on a pair of pink glasses at the “Pink Out Night” Ada football matchup against Bethany Friday night, Sept. 22, 2017 at Norris Field. The Cougars defeated the Bronchos 35-28.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News — Rayne Wofford claps his hands for the Allen Mustangs at their football game against Wetumka Friday, Sept. 1, 2017 in Allen.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News — Ahna Redwine tries to spray colored powder at a friend at a color run Saturday, Sept. 9, 2017 at Ada High School.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News — Ada High School students spray colored powder in the air at a color run Saturday, Sept. 9, 2017 at the school.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
Seacret Minor smiles as she flirts with Roary, the East Central University Tiger mascot, at the football matchup against Ouachita Baptist Saturday, Sept. 23, 2017 at Norris Field.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News — City of Ada worker Wendell Alfred paints a traffic signal Thursday, Sept. 7, 2017 at 14th Street and Mississippi.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
Musicians Kelsie Pickard and Owen Pickard perform at People’s Electric Cooperative (PEC) Day Saturday, Sept. 30, 2017 at the Pontotoc County Agri-Plex.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —

October

Richard R. Barron – The Ada News — Photographer Richard R. Barron photographed his silhouette in an oily puddle Wednesday, Oct. 4, 2017 in a downtown Ada alley.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
The Allen High School band plays The Star Spangled Banner prior to the Allen football game vs Maysville Thursday, Oct. 19, 2017 in Allen.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
Thunderstorm clouds billow to the north and east of the Ada area Monday, Oct. 9, 2017 in this image made from Byng. The storms were associated with a cold front that dropped daytime high temperatures 30 degrees in some locations.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
Ada High School cheerleaders lift their hands for a kickoff during second quarter football action agaist Tulsa Central Thursday, Oct. 19, 2017 at Norris Field.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
The Experimental Aircraft Association’s 1929 Ford Tri-Motor historic airliner took to the skies of Ada Thursday, Oct. 26, 2017, as part of the aircraft’s nationwide tour. The East Central University athletic complex is visible, including a soccer game in progress in the lower left portion of the frame.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
Sam Holcomb and his mother Mia Holcomb dress as the “son and moon” for the City of Ada’s Annual Mummy and Son Dance Thursday, Oct. 26, 2017 at Wintersmith Lodge.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
Dressed as a wolf, Madison Bruton watches the East Central University Homecoming Parade Saturday, Oct. 28, 2017 on Main Street in Ada.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
East Central University School of Business Dean Wendell Godwin takes a pie in the face for charity at the Tiger homecoming football game vs Arkansas Tech Saturday, Oct. 28, 2017 at Norris Field in Ada.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
Gavin Burl reacts to being named Homecoming King at the East Central University Tiger homecoming football game vs Arkansas Tech Saturday, Oct. 28, 2017 at Norris Field in Ada.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
Elizabeth Cain is Zombie Little Bo Peep at the DARE Halloween Safe House Tuesday, Oct. 31, 2017 at the Pontotoc County Agri-Plex.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
McKynzie Shelton and Nevaeh Graves wait in line to enter the DARE Halloween Safe House Tuesday, Oct. 31, 2017 at the Pontotoc County Agri-Plex.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
Nate Phillips portrays Chucky from the “Child’s Play” film franchise at the DARE Halloween Safe House Tuesday, Oct. 31, 2017 at the Pontotoc County Agri-Plex,
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
Latta baseball Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017 in Mustang.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
Latta baseball Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017 in Mustang.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
ECU soccer vs Ouachita Baptist Thursday, Oct. 26, 2017 at ECU.

November

Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
The Ada High cheerleaders dance and laugh as they await the start of the Harrahvs Ada football senior night, Friday, Nov. 3, 2017 at Norris Field. Ada won the contest 31-13.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
Ada High cheerleaders stand in front a giant spirit banner and the giant inflatable cougar at the start of the Harrah vs Ada football senior night matchup, Friday, Nov. 3, 2017 at Norris Field. Ada won the game, the last of the regular season, 31-13.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
Ada High students dance together to the band’s song “LIght Up” at the start of the four quarter of their football game vs the Elgin Owls in first-round of Class 4A playoff action Friday night, Nov. 10, 2017 at Norris Field. Ada won the contest 42-19.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
Ada football vs the Elgin Owls in first-round of Class 4A playoff action Friday night, Nov. 10, 2017 at Norris Field.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
Ada football fans dance on the field after the Ada vs Oologah game Friday, Nov. 17, 2017 at Norris Field in Ada. The Cougars defeated the Mustangs 27-20 to advance to the Class 4A semi-finals.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
Ada vs Oologah Friday, Nov. 17, 2017 at Norris Field in Ada. The Cougars defeated the Mustangs 27-20 to advance to the Class 4A semi-finals.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
Ada vs Bethany in the Class 4A semi-final football playoff game Saturday afternoon, Nov. 25, 2017 at Noble High School.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
Ada vs Oologah Friday, Nov. 17, 2017 at Norris Field in Ada. The Cougars defeated the Mustangs 27-20 to advance to the Class 4A semi-finals.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
Ada vs Bethany in the Class 4A semi-final football playoff game Saturday afternoon, Nov. 25, 2017 at Noble High School.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
Ada Cougar football fans react to a go-ahead touchdown in the Ada vs Bethany Class 4A semi-final football playoff game Saturday afternoon, Nov. 25, 2017 at Noble High School.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
Ada football fans react to a late turnover at the Ada vs Bethany Class 4A semi-final football playoff game Saturday afternoon, Nov. 25, 2017 at Noble High School. Ada won 26-22 to advance to the state championship game.

December

Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
The Ada High Cougars took on Heritage Hall in the Class 4A state championship game Friday night, Dec. 1, 2017 at Choctaw High School. Heritage Hall defeated Ada 14-0 to claim the championship.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
The Ada High Cougars took on Heritage Hall in the Class 4A state championship game Friday night, Dec. 1, 2017 at Choctaw High School. Heritage Hall defeated Ada 14-0 to claim the championship.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
A U.S. flag made from children’s handprints hangs on a wall Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017 at Washington Grade Center.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
30th Annual Pat Taylor Memorial Parade Lights goers huddle against the cold Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017 in downtown Ada.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
The Ada High marching band plays in the 30th Annual Pat Taylor Memorial Parade of Lights Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017 in downtown Ada.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
A stripe of morning sunlight streams onto friends and families in the audience at East Central University commencement ceremonies Saturday, Dec. 9, 2017 at the Kerr Activities Center.
Richard R. Barron / The Ada News —
Lights in Wintersmith Park Thursday night, Dec. 14, 2017.
2+

More Stars, More Stripes, More Fun

Motorcyclists and police officers line up to escort runners in the 50th Annual Fireball Classic half-marathon, 10k , and 5k race Tuesday morning, July 4, 2017 in Wintersmith Park. This image was on the front page of the July 6 Ada News.
Motorcyclists and police officers line up to escort runners in the 50th Annual Fireball Classic half-marathon, 10k , and 5k race Tuesday morning, July 4, 2017 in Wintersmith Park. This image was on the front page of the July 6 Ada News.

On a couple of occasions before, I have described how much fun I have covering Ada’s Independence Day celebrations in historic Wintersmith Park. Our community goes all-out, starting with the Fireball Classic half-marathon, 10k, and 5k races (this year was the 50th), followed by kids games, then grown-up games, then fireworks at dark over Wintersmith Lake.

I dug around in the morgue and found this page, my first opportunity to cover Ada's July 4 fun, 1989. "PYAT" in the headline refers to the long-defunct group Proud Young Americans for Truth.
I dug around in the morgue and found this page, my first opportunity to cover Ada’s July 4 fun, 1989. “PYAT” in the headline refers to the long-defunct group Proud Young Americans for Truth.

Having shot this event year after year has been more than a pleasure, it’s been a privilege to offer my view of this historic family-friendly piece of Americana.

A happy coincidence of ads and free space let us use a nice package of my images in color on pages 5 and 6 Thursday. It is my hope that everyone enjoyed the images, and that they spend many years tacked to bulletin boards and stuck on refrigerator doors.
A happy coincidence of ads and free space let us use a nice package of my images in color on pages 5 and 6 Thursday. It is my hope that everyone enjoyed the images, and that they spend many years tacked to bulletin boards and stuck on refrigerator doors.
0

Learning the Trade: College

Robert Stinson poses under a streetlamp on the South Oval at Oklahoma University in January 1984. We were both photographers at OU back then, and remain friends to this day. I shot it with my Nikon FM2 on a tripod, with my 28mm f/2.8 Nikkor, and Plus-X Pan Film.
Robert Stinson poses under a streetlamp on the South Oval at Oklahoma University in January 1984. We were both photographers at OU back then, and remain friends to this day. I shot it with my Nikon FM2 on a tripod, with my 28mm f/2.8 Nikkor, and Plus-X Pan Film.
I cheated a little to make this image of a 1984 snowball fight: I asked my sister's roommate to pose for it. I made this with my 105mm on Plus-X Pan Film.
I cheated a little to make this image of a 1984 snowball fight: I asked my sister’s roommate to pose for it. I made this with my 105mm on Plus-X Pan Film.

My young friend Mackenzee Crosby was just accepted to Oklahoma University and intends to go to journalism school. These events left me reminiscing about my own experiences at OU in the early 1980s.

My educational experiences as an instructor have reenforced what I have always believed, that education is very learner-defined, meaning that it depends very much on how motivated the student is to absorb what the instructor is offering.

College, by extension, isn’t as valuable as it could be because many people get through it just to get through it. On the occasions when I taught college, students were all over the place: lazy, excited, cynical, fun, bored, motivated, selfish, ambitious.

I will add that as the years have passed, a college degree is worth less. For a while the mantra was “you need a master’s degree,” and now it is, “you need a doctorate.”

I made this portrait of my friend Anna Maria in 1983. Shot on Kodak Panatomic-X film, ISO 32, with my 105mm. The light is a two-flash setup, one bounced off the wall to my left, and the other behind her. I thought she was beautiful in 1983, and I was not wrong.
I made this portrait of my friend Anna Maria in 1983. Shot on Kodak Panatomic-X film, ISO 32, with my 105mm. The light is a two-flash setup, one bounced off the wall to my left, and the other behind her. I thought she was beautiful in 1983, and I was not wrong.
Using a red filter and Tri-X Pan Film, this is one of my earliest "fine art" attempts.
Using a red filter and Tri-X Pan Film, this is one of my earliest “fine art” attempts.

In any case, I learned very little of my actual tradecraft from classes I took. The overwhelming majority of my skills came from my motivation to be a journalist: shooting, working in the darkroom, getting published in the yearbook and the student newspaper, and getting work from various media. I couldn’t wait until a journalism class was over so I could go do some journalism.

I made this image of a pie-in-the-face event for the Sooner Yearbook in 1984. This was the day I met Scott Andersen, who was shooting it for the Oklahoma Daily student newspaper. It was shot on Kodak Plus-X Film with my 105mm f/2.5 Nikkor.
I made this image of a pie-in-the-face event for the Sooner Yearbook in 1984. This was the day I met Scott Andersen, who was shooting it for the Oklahoma Daily student newspaper. It was shot on Kodak Plus-X Film with my 105mm f/2.5 Nikkor.
This is my official "candid" self-portrait for the colophon of the 1985 Sooner Yearbook. I am holding a Nikon FM2 with my 105mm f/2.5.
This is my official “candid” self-portrait for the colophon of the 1985 Sooner Yearbook. I am holding a Nikon FM2 with my 105mm f/2.5.

I had in mind during my college years that yearbook and magazine represented better quality than newspaper, so much of the time, I tried to get the sharpest and finest quality from my work, and preferred to sell it to glossy publications instead of dailies. Having been a newspaper intern in the summers of 1982 and 1983, I knew that newspaper photography was, as a fellow photographer said to me at the time, “meatball photography.”

I got to know several of my fellow student photographers well, but none more than Scott AndersEn and Robert Stinson, who remain close friends and respected fellow photographers to this day.

It seemed like a big deal at the time to have a sideline pass to photograph Oklahoma football.
It seemed like a big deal at the time to have a sideline pass to photograph Oklahoma football.
A young lady I was courting at the time holds my then-new Nikon FE2 with the 50mm f/1.2 Nikkor. She was a twirler for the band at rival Oklahoma State.
A young lady I was courting at the time holds my then-new Nikon FE2 with the 50mm f/1.2 Nikkor. She was a twirler for the band at rival Oklahoma State.

My film of choice was usually Kodak Tri-X rated at about ISO 250, souped in Kodak Microdol-X, using the 1:3 dilution, 75 degrees for 13 minutes, thought at the time to produce better grain and sharpness. I experimented with all kinds of products, but came back to those again and again.

I had three camera bodies, a Nikon FM, which I bought in January 1982, a Nikon FM2, which I got in 1983, and a Nikon FE2, bought in 1984 when a friend suggested it instead of another FM2. All of them had the MD-12 motor drive.

I had four lenses in my basic bag through college, a 28mm f/2.8 Nikkor, a 50mm f/1.2 Nikkor, a 105mm f/2.5 Nikkor, and a 200mm f/4 Nikkor. The 105mm was my go-to favorite, since it was sharp, light, bright, and easy to use. Near the end of my college life I got a 55mm f/2.8 Micro-Nikkor.

This is the Nikon FE2 at the end of its life in 2003, right before I sold it.
This is the Nikon FE2 at the end of its life in 2003, right before I sold it.
One of my roommates, Matthew Hyubich, poses for an illustration of students falling asleep while studying, which I made for the Sooner Yearbook with my 50mm f/1.2 Nikkor.
One of my roommates, Matthew Hyubich, poses for an illustration of students falling asleep while studying, which I made for the Sooner Yearbook with my 50mm f/1.2 Nikkor.

I used the darkroom in Copeland Hall, which was shared by newspaper and yearbook students, and which was often quite a mess. Most photographers and dilettantes never understood that the chemicals – developer, fixer, stop bath, wetting agent – were anything other than water, and tended to spill them, contaminate them, use them up and not replace them. I became the de facto manager of the darkroom, and cleaned it all the time.

Oklahoma University tried to do a "Hands Across OU" thing while Hands Across America was going on, but it came up short, as in this image I shot with my 200mm f/4 Nikkor on Tri-X Pan Film.
Oklahoma University tried to do a “Hands Across OU” thing while Hands Across America was going on, but it came up short, as in this image I shot with my 200mm f/4 Nikkor on Tri-X Pan Film.

I had a crush on at least four of our Sooner Yearbook staffers, but no one on the Oklahoma Daily staff. I never dated any of them, though I certainly tried, and was mostly alone for my time in college.

I shot this from the parking garage above the ticket office at Oklahoma Memorial Stadium before an OU football game. A few seconds later I dropped clip-on metal lens hood from my 105mm Nikkor lens to the ground below. Fortunately, it didn't hit anyone.
I shot this from the parking garage above the ticket office at Oklahoma Memorial Stadium before an OU football game. A few seconds later I dropped clip-on metal lens hood from my 105mm Nikkor lens to the ground below. Fortunately, it didn’t hit anyone.
Robert lived in a basement apartment for a while during that period, and installed this chair by hanging it from some pipes.
Robert lived in a basement apartment for a while during that period, and installed this chair by hanging it from some pipes.

I used all my own darkroom gear, including tanks, reels, and chemicals, since I could almost guarantee the other photographers would compromise the supplies in the darkroom. During finals week in an art class in 1983, I souped some slide film in the chemistry they provided, which had been contaminated, and which ruined my film, forcing an urgent reshoot.

Once, when I was walking home with my backpack stuffed with photo gear, I heard some frat turds yelling at me, “Hey, nurd!” Yeah, frat guys in college: a topic for another day.

At one point I dropped by The Tulsa World and showed some of my stuff to the managing editor, who kept asking, “You’re a student?”

In the fall of 1985, I got a call from The Shawnee News-Star, and started my career as a news photographer.

This was one of my favorite images from the era, of the bonfire prior to the 1984 OU-Texas game, shot with my 105mm f/2.5.
This was one of my favorite images from the era, of the bonfire prior to the 1984 OU-Texas game, shot with my 105mm f/2.5.
0

2016: The Year in Pictures

What does a year of my images at The Ada News look like? Here are some samples of my work from 2016…

January

House Fire
House Fire
House Fire
House Fire
Basketball
Basketball
Basketball
Basketball
Basketball
Basketball
Sunrise
Sunrise
Basketball
Basketball
Little Mustang
Little Mustang
Basketball
Basketball

February

Senior Night
Senior Night
Train
Train
Basketball
Basketball
Basketball
Basketball
Painting
Painting
Stray
Stray
Sunset
Sunset

March

Dejection
Dejection
Baseball
Baseball
Windy Day
Windy Day
Baseball
Baseball
Baseball
Baseball

April

Tornado Damage
Tornado Damage
Baseball
Baseball
Color Run
Color Run
Senior Night
Senior Night
Candlelight Vigil
Candlelight Vigil
Sunshine after Rain
Sunshine after Rain

May

Soccer
Soccer
Softball
Softball
Baseball
Baseball
Dejection
Dejection
Manhunt
Manhunt
Manhunt
Manhunt
Graduation
Graduation
Graduation
Graduation
Graduation
Graduation
Basketball Camp
Basketball Camp
Basketball Fan
Basketball Fan
Red Nose Day
Red Nose Day
Playing in the Park
Playing in the Park

June

Playing in the Park
Playing in the Park
Splash Park
Splash Park
Relay for Life
Relay for Life

July

Art in the Park
Art in the Park
Baseball Mom
Baseball Mom
Young Cowboys
Young Cowboys
Giant Turtle Races
Giant Turtle Races
Dog in the Park
Dog in the Park
Peach Parade
Peach Parade
Sunset at Ball Park
Sunset at Ball Park
State Champions
State Champions

August

School Circle
School Circle
Baseball
Baseball
Media Day
Media Day
Media Day
Media Day
Baseball
Baseball
Girls Playing
Girls Playing
Police Shooting
Police Shooting
Injury
Injury
Baseball
Baseball
Foggy Morning
Foggy Morning
AdaFest
AdaFest
Tetherball
Tetherball
Sideline
Sideline
Football
Football

September

Baseball
Baseball
Baseball
Baseball
Bonfire
Bonfire
Fumble
Fumble
Baseball
Baseball
Selfies
Selfies
Game Night
Game Night
Press Box
Press Box
Halftime
Halftime
Free Fair
Free Fair
Free Fair
Free Fair
Softball
Softball
Sunrise
Sunrise
Royalty
Royalty

October

Alumni Softball
Alumni Softball
Coin Toss
Coin Toss
National Anthem
National Anthem
Pink Smoke
Pink Smoke
House of Horrors
House of Horrors

November

Football
Football
Football
Football
Champions
Champions
Flags
Flags
Salute
Salute
Little Dribblers
Little Dribblers
House Fire
House Fire

December

Basketball
Basketball
Christmas Tea
Christmas Tea
Basketball
Basketball
Wax Museum
Wax Museum
Basketball
Basketball
Basketball
Basketball
Photographer
Photographer
Christmas Parade
Christmas Parade
Christmas Parade
Christmas Parade
Ribbon Cutting
Ribbon Cutting
Christmas Lights
Christmas Lights
Christmas Decorations
Christmas Decorations
0

Why Canyonlands?

The author stands at the edge of a 1200-foot cliff face at Grand View Point in the Island in the Sky District of Canyonlands National Park, Utah in April 2011.
The author stands at the edge of a 1200-foot cliff face at Grand View Point in the Island in the Sky District of Canyonlands National Park, Utah in April 2011.

Many people seem amazed and delighted when I tell them, or show them pictures, of our wedding at Delicate Arch in Arches National Park near Moab, Utah. It is an amazing, beautiful spot, and the morning we got married there we had beautiful blue skies, abundant sunshine, and few visitors. But it’s not always like that.

Storm clouds brood over the Squaw Flat Campground in The Needles District at Canyonlands National Park in the spring of 2013. Even the trail circling the campground in this park is spectacular.
Storm clouds brood over the Squaw Flat Campground in The Needles District at Canyonlands National Park in the spring of 2013. Even the trail circling the campground in this park is spectacular.
Our small wedding party conducts our ceremony in brilliant morning sunshine at Delicate Arch in Arches National Park, Utah, October 12, 2004.
Our small wedding party conducts our ceremony in brilliant morning sunshine at Delicate Arch in Arches National Park, Utah, October 12, 2004.

The trouble is that Arches has, like so many once-wild places, been “discovered.” By that I mean that a combination of the internet and digital photography, huge numbers of people have decided to make sites like Delicate Arch their destination. They see gorgeous images of scenes like that and want a piece of it themselves.

The flaw in that kind of thinking is that at this point in digital history, places like Delicate Arch don’t have as much to offer because of the very discovery that made them popular. We’ve all seen these images too many times. I’ll grant you that there is some photographic potential yet to be cultivated there, but you have to take more steps toward the unusual to do it. Sunrise. In the snow. With the Milky Way behind it. And so on.

This paragraph shows Delicate Arch and its more or less continuous entourage of photographers on an afternoon in April 2013.
This paragraph shows Delicate Arch and its more or less continuous entourage of photographers on an afternoon in April 2013.
Though it is increasingly crowded, my wife and I still hold a special place in our hearts for Arches National Park and its signature feature, Delicate Arch, which we last visited and photographed in October 2014.
Though it is increasingly crowded, my wife and I still hold a special place in our hearts for Arches National Park and its signature feature, Delicate Arch, which we last visited and photographed in October 2014.

But we still see droves of self-important-looking photographers gathered on the approaches to Delicate Arch or in The Windows Section, with their $6000 cameras on their $1200 tripods, squinting joylessly at the target, making the same picture I made the first time, and every time, I go there.

It’s played out. It has become one of the “windshield tourism” National Parks. Even though my wife Abby and I have something of a special claim to the place, when we go there, we don’t take very much equipment, and we don’t take very many pictures.

But there is hope. Canyonlands.

Evening sun strikes sandstone pillars in Monument Basic, a dominant feature at Canyonlands National Park.
Evening sun strikes sandstone pillars in Monument Basic, a dominant feature at Canyonlands National Park.
The author hikes on the Chocolate Drops trail in The Maze District of Canyonlands National Park in May 2012. On the entire three-day excursion to this area, I only saw about five other people.
The author hikes on the Chocolate Drops trail in The Maze District of Canyonlands National Park in May 2012. On the entire three-day excursion to this area, I only saw about five other people.

There are parts of Canyonlands National Park that see only a handful of visitors every year. In The Maze District, for example, the rangers will warn you when you check in at the Hans Flat Ranger Station that, “You must be capable of self-sustenance and self-rescue.” Presumably this means they can’t come rescue you if you have a flat tire or a heart attack, or that it will cost thousands of dollars and will disturb the other visitors. When Dennis Udink and I visited The Maze in 2012, though, we only saw five other people during our three-day stay.

The Needles District at Canyonlands is, like the other districts, labyrinthian, as in this November 2002 image.
The Needles District at Canyonlands is, like the other districts, labyrinthian, as in this November 2002 image.
This biggest obstacle to most visitors in The Maze District at Canyonlands is the "road," seen here in 2012.
This biggest obstacle to most visitors in The Maze District at Canyonlands is the “road,” seen here in 2012.

Even in the easier-to-access sections of Canyonlands, there are only a handful of roadside turnouts. The rest of the park is scattered trail heads and many miles of trails, most of which I have hiked, but many of which, unlike the trails in Arches, remain on my to-do list. Some of the Canyonlands trails are long enough and difficult enough to require multi-day backpacking trips to make it from one end to the other.

I was able to introduce my wife Abby to Canyonlands in 2010, in the Island in the Sky District.
I was able to introduce my wife Abby to Canyonlands in 2010, in the Island in the Sky District.

Canyonlands is four and a half times larger than Arches, but receives about two and a half times fewer visitors. The most difficult marked trail at Arches is the Primitive Loop trail, so named, I expect, to at least somewhat discourage non-hikers from attempting the hike, which is 7.2 miles long and crosses varied terrain. Still, nearly every trail at Canyonlands is more difficult and primitive than the Primitive Loop.

Land of Lakes?
In November 2007, a park ranger told me that in the early 1960s, the director of the Park Service and the director of the Bureau of Reclamations each wanted to use the area that is now Canyonlands. It’s discouraging to imagine anyone ever considering covering this amazing area in water behind a dam, and I am glad and grateful the Park Service director got his way.

By the time you get more than a few hundred yards down the trails at Canyonlands, the only people you will see are fit, well-equipped, determined hikers. Not only are the trails more challenging at Canyonlands, they’re more fun, pass through more varied and beautiful terrain, and make better pictures.

I made this image, deep in the heart of The Needles District of Canyonlands, in November 2002. It took most of a day to hike to this spot.`
I made this image, deep in the heart of The Needles District of Canyonlands, in November 2002. It took most of a day to hike to this spot.
Spires of Cedar Mesa sandstone, the most common formation at Canyonlands, stand tall on the Devil's Pocket Trail in The Needles District of Canyonlands in March 2010. I hiked nearly an entire day over 12 miles, and saw fewer than a dozen people.
Spires of Cedar Mesa sandstone, the most common formation at Canyonlands, stand tall on the Devil’s Pocket Trail in The Needles District of Canyonlands in March 2010. I hiked nearly an entire day over 12 miles, and saw fewer than a dozen people.

At the most fundamental level of my outdoorism is, I believe, my desire to get as far away from civilization as I can, and the farther I get, the smaller and more humble I feel, and the more I feel like I am really accomplishing something amazing and unique. Canyonlands is one place where I can do that.

To my eye, Canyonlands is even more breathtaking than The Grand Canyon. I made this image from there Grand View Point at the Island in the Sky District of Canyonlands in April 2011.
To my eye, Canyonlands is even more breathtaking than The Grand Canyon. I made this image from there Grand View Point at the Island in the Sky District of Canyonlands in April 2011.
0

Summer Breeze

Carolyn Ross and her daughter Gracie Ross play the Banana Eating Game during the kid's games at the Independence Day 2016 celebration in Wintersmith Park Monday July 4.
Carolyn Ross and her daughter Gracie Ross play the Banana Eating Game during the kid’s games at the Independence Day 2016 celebration in Wintersmith Park Monday July 4.
This is Zach Gray, who was making pictures of his July 4 experience with a mint condition Mamiya C220 twin lens reflect film camera. I'll have more to say about that later.
This is Zach Gray, who was making pictures of his July 4 experience with a mint condition Mamiya C220 twin lens reflect film camera. I’ll have more to say about that later.

The public might not realize that news photographers live a life of feast or famine. At the first of March, we spend twelve hour days darting between basketball playoffs, car crashes, assignments for special sections, and baseball team photo days.

Then when school’s out, editors impatiently tap their feet as we can only give them a photo of a kid in the splash park or somebody running a weed eater.

Then, July 4 happens. In Ada, it’s a huge deal. It starts in Wintersmith Park at 7 am with the Fireball Classic 10k/5k race, Oklahoma’s oldest such event. That’s followed by kid’s games in the park in the morning, then grow-up’s games in the afternoon. Finally, Wintersmith Lake is surrounded by spectators for the traditional Independence Day fireworks display.

For me, it is one of the busiest days of the year, and one of the funnest. It always makes great photos, everyone is always glad to see me, and I always have a great time.

Kids scamper down Scenic Street in Ada's Wintersmith Park during the kid's race at the annual Fireball Classic 10k/5k run.
Kids scamper down Scenic Street in Ada’s Wintersmith Park during the kid’s race at the annual Fireball Classic 10k/5k run.
Children participate in "giant" turtle race during the kid's games at the Independence Day 2016 celebration in Wintersmith Park Monday July 4.
Children participate in “giant” turtle race during the kid’s games at the Independence Day 2016 celebration in Wintersmith Park Monday July 4.
Lana Glover hula-hoops covered in colored powder during the kid's games at the Independence Day 2016 celebration in Wintersmith Park Monday July 4.
Lana Glover hula-hoops covered in colored powder during the kid’s games at the Independence Day 2016 celebration in Wintersmith Park Monday July 4.
One of the teams in the "Water War" takes aim at a plastic barrel mounted on a cable. They and their opponents try to push the barrel to the opposite end.
One of the teams in the “Water War” takes aim at a plastic barrel mounted on a cable. They and their opponents try to push the barrel to the opposite end.
A woman uses a phone to record the fireworks display in Wintersmith Park.
A woman uses a phone to record the fireworks display in Wintersmith Park.
As I was photographing fireworks, I saw a drone above Wintermith Lake. This morning, I had a CD from the operator, Tony Matthews, with some of his photos from the drone, including this one.
As I was photographing fireworks, I saw a drone above Wintermith Lake. This morning, I had a CD from the operator, Tony Matthews, with some of his photos from the drone, including this one.
Loud, bright and colorful, fireworks burst over Wintersmith Lake. I always enjoy them, both photographically and as the kid inside.
Loud, bright and colorful, fireworks burst over Wintersmith Lake. I always enjoy them, both photographically and as the kid inside.
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The Work We Do

Photography students in last month's advanced class photograph each other at the fire training tower at the Pontotoc Technology Center.
Photography students in last month’s advanced class photograph each other at the fire training tower at the Pontotoc Technology Center.
This was my crew for October's advanced digital photography class.
This was my crew for October’s advanced digital photography class.

Here are a few images from the advanced class I taught in October. My students were attentive and engaged, and had many breakthrough moments.

Teaching photography is one of my favorite activities.

They photographed me photographing them through a practice welding hole.
They photographed me photographing them through a practice welding hole.
We climbed the fire training tower for sunset.
We climbed the fire training tower for sunset.
From high on the fire tower, we saw the last of the sunset reflecting on the main building of the Technology Center.
From high on the fire tower, we saw the last of the sunset reflecting on the main building of the Technology Center.
We spotted this tagged and peeling paint on a car used for rescue practice.
We spotted this tagged and peeling paint on a car used for rescue practice.
Sunset light cast these lines of shadow on a wall of the fire training tower.
Sunset light cast these lines of shadow on a wall of the fire training tower.
After sunset we were able to photograph excellent clouds.
After sunset we were able to photograph excellent clouds.
As darkness arrived, we worked by streetlight, as in the case of photographing this broken mirror on an old ambulance.
As darkness arrived, we worked by streetlight, as in the case of photographing this broken mirror on an old ambulance.
Finally, on our way back to the classroom, in almost total darkness, we made this image of our shadows.
Finally, on our way back to the classroom, in almost total darkness, we made this image of our shadows.
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Why Beautiful Moments Are Beautiful

I've made various iterations of this image over the years, but it never gets old. This view looks north from the south end of the pond at the vo-tech, and while we were making it, showed us the value of moving, particularly up and down, to fine tune a composition.
I’ve made various iterations of this image over the years, but it never gets old. This view looks north from the south end of the pond at the vo-tech, and while we were making it, showed us the value of moving, particularly up and down, to fine tune a composition.

As photographers, we have a tendency to get a bit on the self-important side. For example, we often scoff at soccer moms with cell phones. We also tend to classify cameras as “amateur” or “professional” while losing sight of the fact that it is we who are amateurs or professionals.

We spotted this image early in our walk. It features on of my favorite tricks: locking my exposure with the sun hidden, then moving slightly to bring it into the image at the just the right brightness. It is very effective at expressing the brilliance of sunshine.
We spotted this image early in our walk. It features on of my favorite tricks: locking my exposure with the sun hidden, then moving slightly to bring it into the image at the just the right brightness. It is very effective at expressing the brilliance of sunshine.
I made these ripples by throwing a stick into the pond.
I made these ripples by throwing a stick into the pond.

One of the most significant aspects of professional photography is having our audience in mind at all times, whether the audience is readers in a publication, attendees at an art expo, visitors to our home, viewers of web sites, or just us trying to explore ourselves through imagery.

With our audience in mind, the purpose of our photography is almost always to illicit an emotional response. Maybe, as is sometimes the case in my work, our goal is to bring the feelings of triumph or tragedy to the reader. Maybe, as in the case of a wedding photographer, our goal is to bring joyful and intimate moments of the event to the viewer.

In either case, and many more, the central idea is use our cameras to translate moments into images, which then bring those moments to the audience.

I had four students in this most recent session, which is a good number. I feel like they got a lot out of it, and were excited to return for two more nights.
I had four students in this most recent session, which is a good number. I feel like they got a lot out of it, and were excited to return for two more nights.

What about beauty? Flowers. Sunsets. Canyons. Forests. Essentially, beautiful photographs work because they elicit an emotional response in the viewer. A snowboarder flying off a cliff edge elicits excitement. Sunlight filtering through a tree elicits memories of childhood. Grey-black clouds of a thunderstorm illicit feelings of foreboding.

I thought about these ideas recently as my intermediate/advanced class went on our walk to the pond at the Pontotoc Technology Center. Ostensibly intended to guide them from the nuts-and-bolts in the beginner classes to putting those tools to work, invariably we discover much more to photograph, often in the beauty of nature. When we do, it has a way of feeding itself, such that I can stand back and act as advisor, and let my students grow and explore their imaging potential.

Even after the light was mostly gone, the sky offered this silhouette. It shows the value of patience, and waiting for the light when other photographers might be long gone.
Even after the light was mostly gone, the sky offered this silhouette. It shows the value of patience, and waiting for the light when other photographers might be long gone.
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Standing on Higher Ground

“…I see the world
And I’m looking from a high place
Way above it all
Standing on higher ground…”
~Alan Parsons Project

Firefighters and police officers prepare to rescue a man who was wash downstream in floodwaters a few days ago near Stonewall, Oklahoma. I made this image from atop a flatbed truck.
Firefighters and police officers prepare to rescue a man who was wash downstream in floodwaters a few days ago near Stonewall, Oklahoma. I made this image from atop a flatbed truck.
This is the rocket ship playground piece in Ada's Glenwood Park.
This is the rocket ship playground piece in Ada’s Glenwood Park.

At this point in my career, the firefighters in my community know that I will ask if I can stand on their fire trucks, or if they have it deployed, their ladder truck, to make pictures. Just a few days ago, at the scene of a water rescue, I asked the owner of a flatbed trash truck if I could climb on it, and he obliged.

Your host poses for a selfie on the fourth stage of a playground rocket today.
Your host poses for a selfie on the fourth stage of a playground rocket today.

There are very few things I won’t climb on or ride in that are high up or flying. Not only is this an excellent strategy for getting a clearer view of everything in my photos, and a smart play for making images that are out of the ordinary, I love climbing on stuff.

This shouldn’t come as any kind of surprise for those who have read the pages of our travel blog or my photo blog and seen the extremes I’ll explore for an image. Even when I can’t get on something high or in something flying, I tend to try to get my camera as high or low as I am able to reach, for the same reason: seeing things and photographing them from a different perspective.

This is the view of Main Street in Ada from the fourth state of the Glenwood Park rocket ship.
This is the view of Main Street in Ada from the fourth state of the Glenwood Park rocket ship.

One of my assignments today was to photograph the venerable four-stage rocket ship playground piece in Ada’s Glenwood Park. It’s been around for decades. I remembered at least one previous occasions on which I squoze through the holes and ladders to reach the top to photograph a child who was playing up there, and today I decided to climb it again, just to be climbing. I vaguely remembered that it swayed back and forth with my movements the last time I was up there, and sure enough, I was right. I have to admit that as it was swaying, I thought it would be hysterically funny (in a tragic way) if it fell over and the headline in my own newspaper would say I was killed in a rocket crash.

This was the only artsy image I was able to conjure from the climb, since the view in all directions was mostly obscured by trees. Still, it was nice to be atop a rocket for a change.
This was the only artsy image I was able to conjure from the climb, since the view in all directions was mostly obscured by trees. Still, it was nice to be atop a rocket for a change.
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Intimate Moments

I hope my teaching points have not gotten redundant. I try to reinvent myself, like I try to reinvent my photography, every day. But I know it’s easy to fall into ruts, ruts we sometimes don’t even see.

I say that because four years ago I wrote a piece called “Intimacy,” about the value of using our images to explore intimacy in the moments of our lives. Then last night, working at the annual Relay for Life cancer fundraising event, I ran into long-time friend and cancer survivor Tresa Euper. We talked for a while, then both went in different directions when the opening ceremonies started. As I waited for the start of the “survivor lap,” that marks the start of the all-night walk, we were all set upon by smartphone photographers who were all making essentially the same photo over and over: the hold-away selfie. Grip, grin, snap. Grip, grin, snap.

Then I looked over and, with my 80-200mm f/2.8, shot about three frames of this…

Tresa Euper shares a moment with her husband.
Tresa Euper shares a moment with her husband.

I shared the image with her on Facebook (her only web presence), and she replied, “Oh Richard, you captured a special moment – one where I was thinking of just how much my ‘caregiver’ went through right alongside me in my fight. All survivors owe so much to all of our caregivers. Thank you so much for this. It’s a picture I’ll treasure forever. And it’s always so good to see you too!

Intimacy.

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Test Driving Instagram

I captured this raining morning shot in the parking lot of my workplace using my iPhone 5 and Instagram.
I captured this raining morning shot in the parking lot of my workplace using my iPhone 5 and Instagram.

One of the web’s fastest growing sectors is social media that allows users to take advantage of the very sophisticated, growingly excellent cameras built into their smart phones. These applications (“apps”) include Apple’s iPhoto and its successor Photos, Tumblr, Pinterest, Hipstamatic, SmugMug, Twitter, Posterous, Flickr, and Facebook, which owns the subject of this review, Instagram.

Instagram isn’t for everyone. It takes rectangular photos from your phone’s camera and makes them square, which is a little odd, and resizes them to 640×640. (It does leave the original image in your photo library.) Odder still are the filters, which go by pretentious and not-very-explainatory names like Lark, Slumber, or Perpetua. The filters are all subtle variations of about four or five motifs, like vignetting, fading, contrast enhancement, and grayscaling.

I made this image using Instagram in Ryan, Oklahoma, and applied one of the app's grayscale filter options.
I made this image using Instagram in Ryan, Oklahoma, and applied one of the app’s grayscale filter options.

For reasons that are still little nebulous to me, Instagram’s square format and faded-print-look filters tend to encourage the use, and overuse, of negative space. I also find that with me, at least, Instagram is not my first choice for “everyday” photos like snapshots, but is my go-to app when I am trying to appear artistic to my audience.

This is one of the shots I made with my iPhone and Instagram yesterday, but I fought the sun the whole time, and find these shots much, much easier and better using a camera with a viewfinder.
This is one of the shots I made with my iPhone and Instagram yesterday, but I fought the sun the whole time, and find these shots much, much easier and better using a camera with a viewfinder.

Any smartphone app, even the built-in camera app, as well as any live-view cameras that don’t have a viewfinder, make it difficult, sometimes approaching impossible, to shoot in bright sun, since the sun can shine on your viewing surface and overwhelm the image. Yesterday at the Ada Air Expo I ran into that exact problem, and found it slowed me down and gave me a headache. Even when I succeeded in making the shot, I usually walked to a shady spot to edit and post it.

Keep in mind that with any photo sharing service, even your own web site, keeping all your photos in one place, like one album on Facebook, will eventually, even with broadband internet and a modern browser, slow to a crawl if visitors are looking at the whole album. In fact, as I write this, I am seeing this very problem on someone’s Facebook page. And now might be a good time to reiterate what I tell my students again and again: no one will look at 1200 photos of anything. This might not seem important to you, unless you post your photos with the intention of sharing them.

One of the toughest tricks about taking the dive into any new image, blogging, or social media item is not letting yourself neglect all your other good creative outlets. In the same way we saw Facebook extinguish countless excellent blogs, Instagram can lead a photographer by the nose away from far nobler, more creative pursuits. My recommendation to anyone who faces this dilemma is to expand, not replace, your creative efforts.

You can see all of my Instagram images here (link).

This is the desktop view of my Instagram profile. The smartphone/tablet view is significantly simplified.
This is the desktop view of my Instagram profile. The smartphone/tablet view is significantly simplified.
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Pomp and Circumstance

Byng High School graduation, 2010
Byng High School graduation, 2010
Your humble host receives his high school diploma, May 31, 1981.
Your humble host receives his high school diploma, May 31, 1981.

In 1982, I had my first newspaper internship, in Lawton, Oklahoma. A friend of my mom’s was friends with the publisher, and got me an interview for a news writing position. But I had just spent the entire semester focusing my energy on being a photographer, and spent all my allowance money on a Nikon FM, a 50mm f/1.8 Nikkor, a 28mm Nikon Series E, and the legendary 105mm f/2.5 Nikkor. In my interview, I kept circling back to how much I wanted to be taking pictures, and I guess my mom’s friend had enough clout that I got my way, because the next Monday I reported to long-time news photographer Bill Dixon.

This was my first published news photo, of downed trees at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, in May 1982.
This was my first published news photo, of downed trees at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, in May 1982.
Latta High School graduation, 1992
Latta High School graduation, 1992

My first assignment was on my first morning: ride with Bill out to the nearby Fort Sill Army base and photograph minor storm damage. That was on a Monday. As I recall, Lawton’s three high schools, Lawton High, Eisenhower High, and MacArthur High, (military town?), all graduated on that Friday night. I lobbied to be allowed to shoot my alma mater, Eisenhower, but was overridden by another photographer, and went to McArthur. I had no experience shooting graduations of any kind, so I made a couple of assumptions… 1) That I needed to shoot direct flash, which we almost always did when I was on yearbook staff in high schoolm (more about this later), and 2) that I needed to shoot pictures of actual graduations, which to me meant kids being handed their diplomas. The second assumption was based on my own graduation a year earlier, the only photo from which was of me being handed my diploma, shot by a commercial photographer who did only that.

Ada High School graduation, 2005
Ada High School graduation, 2005
Stonewall High School graduation, 1995
Stonewall High School graduation, 1995

Predictably, my images from MacArthur were weak. The other photographer’s stuff was really good, and included a mom straightening her son’s cap and tassel. For me and my bloated ego, him outshooting me was a hard lesson, but one I did learn. To this day, my graduation feature photos (three of which are on the front page of The Ada News as I write this) are influenced by that first experience. (That’s what potential employers mean when they ask about your experience.)

East Central University graduation, 2003
East Central University graduation, 2003

What all my graduation coverage photos now have in common is that my cameras and I remain a distant, even invisible observer. That point of view sets my images apart from the maelstrom of grip-and-grin photos a million parents shoot at graduations. There are moments at every graduation – happy ones, sad ones, funny ones – that are interrupted by someone wanted to make a photo. They stop what’s going on and order the subject to smile or “say cheese.” My goal is to stay in the background enough that I don’t interrupt the moment and don’t make anyone, “say cheese.”

It’s not always easy. Everyone in my community knows who I am and what I am doing, so I sometimes need to play a little hide-and-seek with my cameras and my intentions. But it’s worth it to capture real, telling moments.

Ada High School graduation, 2006
Ada High School graduation, 2006
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Being There: Triumph and Heartbreak

Ada Cougar star athelete Cory Kilby smiles as he is congratulated by his teammates after breaking Ada's all-time scoring record at Ada High School's Cougar Activity Center, Feb. 21, 2015.
Ada Cougar star athelete Cory Kilby smiles as he is congratulated by his teammates after breaking Ada’s all-time scoring record at Ada High School’s Cougar Activity Center, Feb. 21, 2015.

One of the most rewarding aspects of my career as a photojournalist is capturing moments in the lives of those around me. It’s also one of the most difficult, because it requires me to be present not only at some of the best moments in people’s lives, but also at some of the worst.

These moments don’t usually sneak up on photographers, so we can be ready: We know that time will run out at the end of a game. We know the Teacher of the Year is about to get her award. We know the police will tape off the crime scene. We know the ball is on the 1-yard line.

I thought about this the other day as I was looking at some images from the 2014-2015 area basketball season. There were many great moments, as there are every season, but a couple stood out. The first happened when Cory Kilby was poised to break Ada High School’s all-time basketball scoring record, and another was when the Stonewall Lady Longhorns lost an area playoff game to Rattan. The two were connected for me because I shot them from almost the exact same spot.

I made the image of Cory Kilby from the west baseline of the court at the Cougar Activity Center, using my AF-S Nikkor 80-200mm f/2.8, a big, heavy zoom lens that excels at low-light sports, feature and news photography. I tried to count the goals he scored, but lost track. I was still ready when the moment happened, and the image it made, of Kilby unable to contain his elation in the moment, is one he, and our readers, will remember and save for a long time.

That image also stands out as an excellent example of the value of photojournalism and the imaging it provides: we make pictures of moments that can’t be repeated or reproduced. You can’t tell Kilby to look that way again after the game for the cameras. The images after the fact are, by their nature, posed and contrived.

Just nine days later, I stood in that same spot as the Stonewall Lady Longhorns battled for a place in the state tournament. The game was close and emotionally engaging, but the Stonewall girls couldn’t hold on for the win. Again, I was on the west baseline, shooting with the same lens, and in the same light, of the same sport, and the emotion the image conveys, of Lauryn Humphers walking dejectedly toward the bench with the Rattan Lady Rams celebrating in the background, is completely opposite from the Kilby image.

My take-away for you and your photography is this: whenever you can, make pictures of real moments as they happen. There is nothing as wonderful as a genuine moment recorded forever, and few things as awkward as trying to pose them after they happen. Have your camera (or, in many instances, phone) ready, and be ready to grab that moment in time.

Stonewall roundballer Lauryn Humphers walks toward her team's bench after the Lady Longhorns lost to Rattan in area tournament play at the Cougar Activity Center March 1, 2015.
Stonewall roundballer Lauryn Humphers walks toward her team’s bench after the Lady Longhorns lost to Rattan in area tournament play at the Cougar Activity Center March 1, 2015.
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Something Beautiful

Since our newspaper started publishing the quarterly Ada Magazine, and I was named its editor, in late 2007, I have included a feature in it called “Something Beautiful.” Its purpose it to feature an inspiring image of something in our area, either by me, my wife Abby, or from submissions from the community.

“Something Beautiful” has proven to be consistently popular, and at least one other newspaper in our chain has borrowed the idea, with similar success.

In fact, if you live in the Ada, Oklahoma area and have an image you think expresses something beautiful, contact me at richard@richardbarron.net with your image, and I will give it due consideration.

Attached are some of my offerings to Ada Magazine‘s readers.

Winter Sunrise
Winter Sunrise
Mimosa Macro
Mimosa Macro
Corporate Headquarters at Sunset
Corporate Headquarters at Sunset
Sunset and Trees
Sunset and Trees
Thunderstorm Tops
Thunderstorm Tops
Rain Tree
Rain Tree
Sunlight Refractions
Sunlight Refractions
Kitten
Kitten
Summer Waterfall
Summer Waterfall
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A Gorgeous Night for Teaching

Beautiful cumulus congestus clouds reflect in the pond at the Pontotoc Technology Center last night.
Beautiful cumulus congestus clouds reflect in the pond at the Pontotoc Technology Center last night.
My students gather to photograph me as I walk toward them in the classic left-right vs front-back motion exercise.
My students gather to photograph me as I walk toward them in the classic left-right vs front-back motion exercise.

My intermediate/advanced photography students and I had a grand night last night that included several photographic epiphanies and a spectacular performance from the light. Everyone had fun and learned a lot.

Some of the participants in this class, like these three girls, are members of the Byng High School Yearbook staff.
Some of the participants in this class, like these three girls, are members of the Byng High School Yearbook staff.
We all pose for a group photo on the bridge over the pond at the Pontotoc Technology Center last night. The evening light was outstanding.
We all pose for a group photo on the bridge over the pond at the Pontotoc Technology Center last night. The evening light was outstanding.
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