A Look Way Back: The Fujica ST605N Camera

The Fujica ST605N camera sits in my home studio today. This camera was my first single lens reflex camera, purchased originally in July 1978.
The Fujica ST605N camera sits in my home studio today. This camera was my first single lens reflex camera, purchased originally in July 1978.
I photographed this evolving thunderstorm from behind our home on 52nd Street in Lawton, Oklahoma, in the late summer of 1978, with the Fujica ST605N.
I photographed this evolving thunderstorm from behind our home on 52nd Street in Lawton, Oklahoma, in the late summer of 1978, with the Fujica ST605N.

For Christmas when I was 13, I wanted a camera. My parents, with the caution of those who don’t know where their children’s lives will go, bought me an affordable Yashica Electro 35 GSN rangefinder camera. With it in my hands I started to learn and yearn about photography. It featured a fixed 45mm f/1.7 lens that was well-made and very sharp. Of course, I wanted one thing this excellent camera couldn’t give me: interchangeable lenses.

So, with some cash sent to me from my grandmother for my 15th birthday, I dug into the seedy underside of the back pages of Modern Photography Magazine to Cambridge Camera Exchange, a discount camera seller run in a rathole in New York City. In July 1978, I owned my first single lens reflex camera, a Fujica ST605N. I paid $127.

My sister Nicole splashes in our backyard pool in the summer of 1978. It was one of my first pictures made with the Fujica ST605N, shot at its fastest shutter speed, 1/700th of a second. At the time, I remember being very pleased with the stop-motion effect.
My sister Nicole splashes in our backyard pool in the summer of 1978. It was one of my first pictures made with the Fujica ST605N, shot at its fastest shutter speed, 1/700th of a second. At the time, I remember being very pleased with the stop-motion effect.
The green Fuji box is exactly as I remember it from the day my ST605N arrived in 1978.
The green Fuji box is exactly as I remember it from the day my ST605N arrived in 1978.

In 1981, I sold the Fujica to a janitor named Junior, and switched to Nikon.

Flash forward to 2018, and enter the nostalgia of Ebay, where a savvy shopper can get almost anything for almost nothing. I poked around and found a really nice ST605N, and paid for it with my PayPal balance.

Though not a large-aperture contender, the 55mm f/2.2 lens that came with the Fujica was, like almost all "normal" lenses, plenty sharp and easy to use.
Though not a large-aperture contender, the 55mm f/2.2 lens that came with the Fujica was, like almost all “normal” lenses, plenty sharp and easy to use.
Shot in January 1981, this image of Trish Jordan was made with the 55mm f/2.2. Trish is one of the kindest people I knew in school, and I am glad we remain friends.
Shot in January 1981, this image of Trish Jordan was made with the 55mm f/2.2. Trish is one of the kindest people I knew in school, and I am glad we remain friends.

In the package was the original green box with the original multi-lingual instruction manual, the camera, the lens, a lens cap, a rubber eye cup, the original leatherette carrying/storage case, and the original black shoulder strap with one of those funny leatherette film canister holders.

When it arrived yesterday and my wife Abby and I unboxed it, she said, “It looks like it’s never been used.”

When review sites and trade magazines talk about “entry level,” this is the camera at the bottom of that rung.

I used the Fujica ST605N for yearbook in 11th and 12th grade. Pictured at a football game in 1980 are, among others, are Jennifer Martin, Tracy Jackson, Mary Shanks, and Rhonda White. They are members of the pom squad.
I used the Fujica ST605N for yearbook in 11th and 12th grade. Pictured at a football game in 1980 are, among others, are Jennifer Martin, Tracy Jackson, Mary Shanks, and Rhonda White. They are members of the pom squad.

Some of its specifications include…

  • The odd fastest shutter speed of 1/700th of a second on the Fujica ST605N was likely a cost-saving measure to keep this entry-level SLR affordable.
    The odd fastest shutter speed of 1/700th of a second on the Fujica ST605N was likely a cost-saving measure to keep this entry-level SLR affordable.

    A horizontally traveling cloth focal plane shutter with speeds of a very peculiar 1/700 of a second to 1/2 second, plus bulb.

  • An M42 lens mount, with screw threads, that dates back to 1949.
  • Stop-down match-needle metering, meaning that to take a meter reading, you push the stop-down lever, darkening the viewfinder to the selected aperture while you adjusted aperture and shutter speed to make the needle on the right side of the viewfinder move up and down until it was centered.
  • A selectable ASA (the precursor to ISO, at least in America) with settings from 25 to 3200.
  • A hot shoe that would fire an electronic flash, and a PC port that would do the same.
  • The viewfinder includes a green shutter speed pointer and scale on the left side, the match-needle +/- on the right side, and combination split image rangefinder surrounded by a microprism collar, surrounded by a  lighter ground glass area, surrounded by the regular ground glass. Focus is smooth and bright in the viewfinder.
  • The standard lens for this camera is the Fujinon 55mm f/2.2. It has a plastic barrel, clicks at full aperture values, and stops down to f/16. It focuses smoothly, like the day I bought the new one in 1978. It focuses and stops down in the same direction as my Nikon lenses.
If the M42 screw-mount seems primitive in the digital era, consider this: it was primitive in 1978.
If the M42 screw-mount seems primitive in the digital era, consider this: it was primitive in 1978.
Whatever It Takes...
Here’s a fun trick from the film era: if your camera didn’t have a multiple exposure lever, you could push and hold the rewind release on the bottom of the camera and crank the advance lever, which would cock the shutter without (hopefully) moving the film.
My first girlfriend Tina, with whom I have lost touch, poses for my Fujica ST605N and its 55mm f/2.2, in 1980.
My first girlfriend Tina, with whom I have lost touch, poses for my Fujica ST605N and its 55mm f/2.2, in 1980.
Back in the film era, we had to carry lots of film. The Fujica I bought on Ebay had this funky little leatherette film canister on its shoulder strap.
Back in the film era, we had to carry lots of film. The Fujica I bought on Ebay had this funky little leatherette film canister on its shoulder strap.

One of the best things about this camera, that I didn’t fully appreciate at the time I owned it, is how small it is compared to its contemporaries. Nikons, Canons and Minoltas of the era were much larger. This camera is almost as small as the legendarily small Olympus OM series.

In the digital age, we can spend all night experimenting with images like this, and instantly review and revise. At the time I made this image, I read about how to do it in Modern Photography, and tried it with just three frames. It was made with the camera on a tripod, then rocking the kinetic sculpture, shooting with a flash, but also using a ½ second exposure to create the "ghosting" effect.
In the digital age, we can spend all night experimenting with images like this, and instantly review and revise. At the time I made this image, I read about how to do it in Modern Photography, and tried it with just three frames. It was made with the camera on a tripod, then rocking the kinetic sculpture, shooting with a flash, but also using a ½ second exposure to create the “ghosting” effect.
Believe it or not, they still sell leatherette camera cases to this day. They are meant for people who don't take pictures and want to keep their cameras locked up like virgins.
Believe it or not, they still sell leatherette camera cases to this day. They are meant for people who don’t take pictures and want to keep their cameras locked up like virgins.

In my review of the Fujifilm S200EXR, I said that an unused camera is a fetish object. I didn’t buy the ST605N to take pictures with it, but for the memories, so I guess it is a fetish object. On the other hand, I made quite a few pictures with it when I owned it the first time, some of which I have included in this entry.

Despite buying a cheap 28mm and getting a 75-200mm one Christmas, I kept coming back to the 55mm. The class of lens has been in my idiom ever since.

I photographed a super-gorgeous girl named Melissa in September 1979 just a few weeks before she moved to another state. This was shot with the 55mm f/2.2.
I photographed a super-gorgeous girl named Melissa in September 1979 just a few weeks before she moved to another state. This was shot with the 55mm f/2.2.

The Fujica ST605N was a beginner’s camera for when I was a beginner, and I learned a lot of important lessons about my craft from this small marvel of film technology from a very different era.

With the film wind lever half-cranked, you can see the cloth focal-plane shutter halfway across the light path. Shutters like this wound onto spools and spring from one spool to the other when triggered.
With the film wind lever half-cranked, you can see the cloth focal-plane shutter halfway across the light path. Shutters like this wound onto spools and spring from one spool to the other when triggered.

 

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