Sitting on Your Pictures

My photographer friends are among the most talented I know, and we made many wonderful images on adventures like this one at Canyonlands National Park, but where are their images now?
My photographer friends are among the most talented I know, and we made many wonderful images on adventures like this one at Canyonlands National Park, but where are their images now?

One aspect of my Intro to Digital Photography class is on the third and final night, during which I talk about what to do with our images. I show and tell about how to organize, edit, save, archive, share, and display our images. Since I am about to start another class, I’ve been recently pondering something that troubles me a bit: photographers or picture-taking civilians who take hundreds or thousand of images and then fail to do anything with them.

This is your host exploring a badlands area in New Mexico. If I wasn't going to share at least some of my images from an adventure like this, why would I even bring a camera?
This is your host exploring a badlands area in New Mexico. If I wasn’t going to share at least some of my images from an adventure like this, why would I even bring a camera?

The occasions that come to mind are three hiking trips I made with three different photographer friends, one in 2011one in 2013. and one in 2014. We had great times, and these three photographers are three of the best I have ever known, so it is utterly baffling to me when they tell me that after we spent all that time on the road and the trail, and captured thousands of images of what I thought were some amazing moments, that they haven’t done anything at all with their images.

I honestly don’t understand this line of reasoning, and I would be happy to hear a real explanation.

Part of why it bothers me is that I know their images are head and shoulders above the everyday images made in those places when we were there, and that their elegance and beauty would enrich us all.

Instead, they sit in a folder on the desktop of a laptop computer somewhere.

Maybe the point of this entry is to encourage anyone who has a folder full of great unshared images to open it and start to explore their potential. Even if most of the images in that folder are throw-aways (most of mine are), there are certainly pearls amongst them. Set them free!

A fellow photographer was standing right next to me when I shot this, and almost certainly has something similar, or different and better. I want to see those images.
A fellow photographer was standing right next to me when I shot this, and almost certainly has something similar, or different and better. I want to see those images.
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4 Comments

  1. LIKE.

    Most people I know fall into one of two categories: (1) shares every photo, no matter how bad or repetitive, and (2) hardly ever shares any photos, no matter how many they got.

    Of course, there’s a gradient between the two extremes; you and I fall somewhere between, in different spots on the scale. Like you, I wish more photographers would “move to the middle”, so to speak.

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