Being There: Triumph and Heartbreak

Ada Cougar star athelete Cory Kilby smiles as he is congratulated by his teammates after breaking Ada's all-time scoring record at Ada High School's Cougar Activity Center, Feb. 21, 2015.
Ada Cougar star athelete Cory Kilby smiles as he is congratulated by his teammates after breaking Ada’s all-time scoring record at Ada High School’s Cougar Activity Center, Feb. 21, 2015.

One of the most rewarding aspects of my career as a photojournalist is capturing moments in the lives of those around me. It’s also one of the most difficult, because it requires me to be present not only at some of the best moments in people’s lives, but also at some of the worst.

These moments don’t usually sneak up on photographers, so we can be ready: We know that time will run out at the end of a game. We know the Teacher of the Year is about to get her award. We know the police will tape off the crime scene. We know the ball is on the 1-yard line.

I thought about this the other day as I was looking at some images from the 2014-2015 area basketball season. There were many great moments, as there are every season, but a couple stood out. The first happened when Cory Kilby was poised to break Ada High School’s all-time basketball scoring record, and another was when the Stonewall Lady Longhorns lost an area playoff game to Rattan. The two were connected for me because I shot them from almost the exact same spot.

I made the image of Cory Kilby from the west baseline of the court at the Cougar Activity Center, using my AF-S Nikkor 80-200mm f/2.8, a big, heavy zoom lens that excels at low-light sports, feature and news photography. I tried to count the goals he scored, but lost track. I was still ready when the moment happened, and the image it made, of Kilby unable to contain his elation in the moment, is one he, and our readers, will remember and save for a long time.

That image also stands out as an excellent example of the value of photojournalism and the imaging it provides: we make pictures of moments that can’t be repeated or reproduced. You can’t tell Kilby to look that way again after the game for the cameras. The images after the fact are, by their nature, posed and contrived.

Just nine days later, I stood in that same spot as the Stonewall Lady Longhorns battled for a place in the state tournament. The game was close and emotionally engaging, but the Stonewall girls couldn’t hold on for the win. Again, I was on the west baseline, shooting with the same lens, and in the same light, of the same sport, and the emotion the image conveys, of Lauryn Humphers walking dejectedly toward the bench with the Rattan Lady Rams celebrating in the background, is completely opposite from the Kilby image.

My take-away for you and your photography is this: whenever you can, make pictures of real moments as they happen. There is nothing as wonderful as a genuine moment recorded forever, and few things as awkward as trying to pose them after they happen. Have your camera (or, in many instances, phone) ready, and be ready to grab that moment in time.

Stonewall roundballer Lauryn Humphers walks toward her team's bench after the Lady Longhorns lost to Rattan in area tournament play at the Cougar Activity Center March 1, 2015.
Stonewall roundballer Lauryn Humphers walks toward her team’s bench after the Lady Longhorns lost to Rattan in area tournament play at the Cougar Activity Center March 1, 2015.
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1 Comment

  1. I’m sure I’ve mentioned it before, but this was always my weak point — getting the emotion of the event. Oh, I got a few, mostly in my last year or two of covering sports. I’d like to think I would have gotten better at it had I stayed active in the field…

    I’ve always loved your emotion photos.

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